Ritzy NJ country club sues waiter after member’s $30k handbag is ruined with red wine

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Most people seek employment to earn money, not hand it over. Yet for one unnamed New Jersey waiter, he may soon be forced to hand over $30,000.

Why? Because the waiter, identified in court papers only as “John Doe,” was rather clumsy. So much so that on Sept. 7, 2018, he reportedly spilled red wine on a $30,000 pink luxury Hermes handbag owned by a local woman named Maryana Beyder.

“Whoever the waiter was proceeded to pour red wine and didn’t stop,” Beyder’s attorney, Alexandra Errico, said to The North Jersey Record. “Poured it all over her. Poured it all over her husband. And poured it all over a very expensive Hermès bag.”

It’s unclear whether the spill was intentional or accidental. It’s also unclear whether “Joe Doe” still works at the luxury Alpine Country Club where this occurred.

What’s known is that the club is extremely high-end:

What’s also known is that, after trying to resolve the issue with the club for over a year, Beyder finally gave up and filed a $30,000 lawsuit sometime last month.

In speculating why the club has been so stubborn about paying up, her attorney suggested that the club’s staff don’t have respect and appreciation for the problems faced by their wealthy clients.

“It’s sort of like a rich person problem,” Errico said. “They couldn’t comprehend that a bag could be that much. I think that was the biggest problem with that. They kind of discriminated against her that she actually owned that type of bag.”

Instead of responding to the suit by just paying up, Alpine Country Club has, as of this week, chosen to sue the employee who caused the spill in the first place.

“In a response to the Oct. 29 lawsuit filed by Maryana Beyder against the Alpine Country Club, the country club denied almost every one of Beyder’s allegations — including that it was liable for the damage to her Hermès Kelly bag — and capped off the response by suing its own employee, according to court records,” the Record reported Monday.

Beyder wasn’t pleased by this stunning move.

“It has absolutely nothing to do with the waiter, we were not trying to collect any money from the waiter,” her attorney said in a statement to the New York Post. “There was never any intention of my client to go after this person at all. The only intention was to have the employer take responsibility.”

She reiterated this in a statement to the Record, saying, “The way the story read is that somehow we’re blaming the employee. We’re not. Not at all. You go to any restaurant. You have a leather jacket on. 100 dollars. 50 dollars. 20 dollars. If a waiter spills on it and it’s destroyed, you’re expecting the restaurant to compensate you for that particular item.”

True, though according to Philadelphia magazine, rarely is the compensation equivalent to the damaged item’s full value.

“The restaurant business is almost entirely dependent on repeat customers, and it’s the manager’s responsibility to make sure you return after a less-than-stellar experience,” the magazine notes.

“So, if the server spills pasta all over your white pants, it’s safe to expect a little extra love — not all the love (definitely not a full-comp, unless the mistake was egregious) — but something, especially if you’re at a spot that’s a little more upscale.”

Some may argue that damaging a $30,000 purse counts as egregious.

What’s perhaps most remarkable about this case isn’t the spill, the original lawsuit by Beyder or the subsequent lawsuit by the club. It’s the public’s revulsion and animosity toward the wealthy New Jersey woman.

Because she’s a wealthy woman, a startling number of Americans seem to believe that she ought to just suck it up and be less of a “b—h.”

Observe (*Language warning):

Note their seething hatred for the wealthy. Would they feel the same way had a waiter damaged THEIR property?

“Everything that’s wrong with this country is spelled out in this article,” one blue check mark-boasting critic opined, adding that nobody should ever own a $30,000 handbag.

It appears that it’s never dawned on this Twitterati member that maybe what’s really wrong with America is that too many people are wasting their lives away stewing in jealousy, envy and resentment instead of living their best lives.

Vivek Saxena

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