Iowa demoted by Dem: Julián Castro calling for change in order of primary states

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In a move that assures you that Julián Castro is not doing well in Iowa, the former Obama administration official is calling for a change in the order of primary states.

After all, what is a Democrat if not one who seeks to change the rules to meet their needs?

The former Housing and Urban Development secretary is struggling in the polls to remain relevant in the 2020 Democratic presidential primary, and his hopes of being the Hispanic Barack Obama are fading fast.

While Iowa has long been a highly accurate presidential bellwether state, Castro said on Sunday during an appearance on MSNBC that the U.S. has changed demographically since Iowa became the first state to cast a vote in presidential elections — the racial connotation is impossible to miss here.

“I actually believe that we do need to change the order of the states, because I don’t believe that we’re the same country we were in 1972,” Castro said. “That’s when Iowa first held its caucus first. And by the time we had the next presidential election in 2024, it will have been more than 50 years since 1972. Our country has changed a lot in those 50 years.”

The issue came up when MSNBC’s Ayman Mohyeldin asked Castro to respond to Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., commenting on the matter — to her credit, with less than three months before Iowans vote, Warren wouldn’t touch the issue with a ten-foot pole.

And it’s not just Iowa that Castro takes exception with, as he named New Hampshire as well, which votes second — the two states being a little too … white for his taste.

(Iowa and New Hampshire are more than 90 percent white, according to the Census Bureau.)

“What I really appreciate about Iowans and the folks of New Hampshire is that they take this process very seriously. They vet the candidates, show up at town halls. They give the people a good hearing,” Castro said. “[At the] same time, demographically, it’s not reflective of the United States as a whole, certainly not reflective of the Democratic Party and other states should have their chance.”

On a positive note, Castro isn’t above letting white people vote, just so long as they wait their turn.

“That doesn’t mean that Iowa and New Hampshire can’t still play a role,” he added. “But I don’t think we should be forever married to Iowa and New Hampshire going first.”

Castro would certainly approve of his home state of Texas going first. Or how about California?

In defense of Iowa being first, a 2016 Des Moines Register editorial highlighted the Hawkeye State’s accuracy in determining the next president.

“Voter selection numbers for the past six presidential election cycles — 1992 through 2012 — prove that Iowa’s vote more closely matches the national general election results than any other state. Based on the voting tabulations, Iowa is the dead-accurate predictor of who the rest of the nation will choose for the next president,” wrote Kevin Flagg and Eric Woolson, two politicos in the state.

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Tom Tillison

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