Amazon pulls ‘Daddy’s Little Slut’ T-shirt for little girls after complaints

The tech giant Amazon was forced to intervene after outrage erupted this week over a controversial children’s t-shirt that contained the words “Daddy’s Little Slut.”

“The product was being sold by third party retailer Onlybabycare, which sells other children’s apparel items via the retailer, such as Taco Bell slogan tees and a hat bearing the words: ‘Black guns matter,'” The Independent reported.

“The ‘Daddy’s little slut’ T-shirt had been on the website since June 2019 and was on sale for half its original price at $18 (£14). The product description read that the top was ‘suitable’ for various occasions, including ‘playing outside, birthday party, baby shower, baptism, wedding, baby photography, daily wear, family day.'”

The since-removed product was reportedly listed as a “unisex” garment suitable for “little girls or boys,” though clearly the product page contained an image of a girl, not a boy.

A cursory glance through Onlybabycare’s Amazon store conducted Saturday afternoon revealed a slew of other children’s clothing and gear — many of the products centered on practically every theme imaginable, from burgers and ice cream to hippies, weightlifting, spiders, the U.K. and more.

The evidence suggest the manufacturer is willing to capitalize on practically everything, including the sexualization of children and normalization of child abuse.

Or at least that’s how the rest of the world has interpreted both its decision to sell a children’s t-shirt with the words “Daddy’s Little Slut” on it, and Amazon’s decision to allow it to sell this provocative shirt in the first place.

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The backlash clearly worked, as Amazon responded by removing the product. However, Onlybabycare’s Amazon store page still remains active.

Two questions remain. Why did Amazon allow the manufacturer to retail this shirt? And why did the manufacturer produce it in the first place? Or did it even …

Some social media users noted that products are often placed on Amazon automatically via software bots.

“Most things of that nature get listed on Amazon through automatic means. Amazon doesn’t know the shirt is objectionable until something’s done that gets actual eyes to look at the listing rather than just programming,” one pointed out.

That makes sense. And there are in fact a slew of tools available on the market that are designed specifically to automate the process of product insertion.

But this still doesn’t explain Onlybabycare’s decision to sell the product, though it may explain how the product wound up being put on sale.

Another social media user pointed out that, as bizarre as it may sound, some money-hungry companies use software tools to automatically generate their products.

“They take a billion phrases and create a billion listings across all product types (shirts, mugs, etc),” the Twitter user writer. “And that right there is a great example of why such a ‘spray and pray’ approach is really stupid.”

It’s not clear whether this claim is legitimate. And even if it were, it’d still be one lousy excuse, or so the user’s critics opined.

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Either way, at least the product is gone now. Of course, some would argue that it should have never appeared on Amazon in the first place …

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