Dems struggle to keep up with Trump campaign, predict ‘nominee will be broke and tired’

Democratic strategists are reportedly concerned about the position of their eventual presidential nominee who will have to play “catch up” to President Trump’s early advantage in key battleground states.

A progressive organization is planning to spend $75 million on digital advertising in locations such as Arizona, Michigan, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin in an effort to counter the Trump campaign’s advertising edge, according to The New York Times.

(Image: Fox News screenshot)

The nonprofit group, called Acronym, is working with former President Barack Obama’s 2008 campaign manager, David Plouffe, to address the concerns Democrats have over Trump’s advantage.

“The gun on this general election does not start when we have a nominee; it started months ago,” Plouffe said. “If the things that need to happen don’t happen in these battleground states between now and May or June, our nominee will never have time to catch up.”

The group is striving to raise enough money to put the eventual Democratic nominee in a viable position to take on Trump leading into the general election next November.

“Our nominee is going to be broke, tired, have to pull together the party and turn around on a dime and run a completely different race for a completely different audience,” Plouffe said.

“There is an enormous amount of danger between now and then,” he added. “If the hole is too steep to dig out of, they’re not going to win.”

Advertising is planned for multiple platforms, including Google, YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, Hulu, and Pandora. In addition, original videos and animations will be featured as well as local news stories in the states which will be aimed at portraying the Trump agenda and administration negatively.

Tara McGowan, the founder and chief executive of Acronym, noted that the group decided to act after months of warning about Trump’s advertising lead.

According to The Times:

Ms. McGowan said the group had already raised approximately 40 percent of the planned $75 million budget. Mr. Plouffe has joined as both a political adviser and to help raise funds. The spending will be made across two groups, Acronym, which is a nonprofit that does not disclose its donors, and Pacronym, a political action committee, which does.

 

“We’re absolutely, as a party, not doing enough and I don’t know that $75 million is enough,” McGowan said. “We can’t afford to not do this work right now.”

Plouffe acknowledged the Trump campaign ad that aired during the World Series game was “compelling.”

“He’s trying to define our entire field as unacceptable to swing voters: ‘They’re socialists, there are going to be 90 percent taxes, you can’t fly on an airplane, you can’t eat steak,’” Plouffe said. “We have to understand there is live fire out there.”

Moments after the House of Representatives voted to formalize the procedures of the Democrat-led impeachment inquiry, Democrats in districts won by Trump in 2016 were targeted in a blistering ad.

As Democrats struggled with an overcrowded field of candidates, the Republican National Committee was busy breaking fundraising records, raising $23.5 million, and $53.8 million cash on hand at the end of August.

The Trump campaign raised millions in just the days following the formal vote on the impeachment inquiry and the president’s sons announced the “unbelievable numbers” just a few short weeks ago.

It seems Americans are letting Democrats know just what they think of their antics against Trump. And the future 2020 Democratic nominee is already at a disadvantage.

“Trump has upped the ante by spending more than any candidate this early in a general election campaign,” McGowan told The New York Times, “and right now our side is simply not on the field.”

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Frieda Powers

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