Opinion

The whistleblower statute and requirements for anonymity have suspended reality in DC

Op-ed views and opinions expressed are solely those of the author.

Wait a minute! Americans are not asking should the whistleblower’s identity be made public…We are asking who he or she is…

More than one respected news source is claiming it is a 33-year old, G13 common grade federal employee, a registered Democrat and an Obama holdover. The suspected DC insider was reassigned for Trump-hating leaks but then later returned to the Central Intelligence Agency. The Yale clerk is purportedly a specialist on Russia and Ukraine and had worked under National Security Advisor Susan Rice. According to federal records, he was a one-time luncheon guest of Biden, unusual and questionable given his low-level position. Biden’s point man on all things Ukraine?

An anonymous co-worker said that the NSC clerk even knew Alexandra Chalupa, the ill-famed Ukranian-American operative for Hillary Clinton who was paid over $400,000 to dig up opposition research.

The convoluted clandestine depths to which opposition research politics sink is truly scary. You can’t make this up. Only in Washington, D.C.

The same co-worker said an email, that was sent to another agency by the suspected whistleblower, reported a Trump meeting with Russian diplomats after the Comey firing  — which later aided the false Russia collusion narrative. The proof? His name and his email is footnoted in Special Counsel Mueller’s report.

Now, so convinced are GOP colleagues of the mole’s identity, that several convincing gumshoes including Paul Sperry of RealClearInvestigations, claim a 40-page dossier on the suspected whistleblower (no doubt with much of the above in it) is circulating Capitol Hill.

A former CIA analyst, Fred Fleitz, admits on his twitter homepage that The Washington Post, The New York Times, Congress, the White House and even the President know the mystery man. If WaPo and NYT  know, they are uncharacteristically closed-lipped. Why is he hidden? Because of his recognized political bias. Or maybe he was a covert operative?

Just prior to the whistleblower report’s announcement in August 2019, Sean Misko, a close friend and colleague, another anti-Trumper, was hired onto Rep. Adam Schiff’s staff, the Washington Examiner reported.

During the shadowed House ‘inquiry’, when Alexander Vindman was asked who he spoke with regarding his concerns about the President’s phone conversation with Ukraine’s Zelensky, Schiff immediately interrupted. A partisan shouting stint then ensued in those hallowed halls.

Since then, Republicans repeatedly inserted the name of the suspected whistleblower into their line of questioning. To which Schiff angrily struck the record.

A legal source many conservative Americans know and trust, Jeannine Pirro, spoke with Tucker Carlson on October 31, about the double standard playing out in our Halls of Congress. “Obama fired the whistleblower in Fast Furious…Rules have changed, a whistleblower had to be directly part of the conversation…When will we ever see people go out in cuffs?”

If the Schiff hearings were an inquiry, the process would grant President Trump the right to face his accuser.

So, what are they? An inquisition. A throwback to a dark time in history when courts were not impartial, when an accused was not told who the accuser was, when the accused was often tortured to reveal incriminating evidence. Sound familiar? Yeah, a witch hunt…

Chairman Schiff argues that whistleblowers “have the right to remain anonymous.”

“Both federal whistleblower laws and the Privacy Act of 1974 protect the individual’s anonymity within the executive branch,” the whistleblower’s attorney Mark Zaid said in a statement.

President Trump allies disagree. Their legal argument? Nothing legally prohibits members of Congress or the President from revealing a whistleblower’s identity, unless…here’s the proverbial clinched nail in a coffin… the individual is a covert agent. So in their eyes, they choose to make the whistleblower’s name public.

“The whistleblower statute never required for anonymity,” says Mark Meadows (R-NC). Meadows has been attending the closed-door impeachment depositions. He is convinced that the whistleblower/covert CIA operative made two contacts before filing his complaint on August 12 to a CIA legal counsel and Schiff’s office. Both contacts highly suspicious.

Chuck Schumer’s warning to MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow shortly after President Trump was elected was curious: “You take on the intelligence community, they have six ways from Sunday at getting back at you.”

Tanya Hazelton

Tanya Hazelton is a former small business owner with a wide range of interests. With a BA in English-Creative Writing, MA in Fine Arts, PhD in Counseling and an AFI screenwriting certificate, she's a published author of supplementary readers in the public schools. Her books are available at Amazon and Barnes&Noble. She is pleased to join BizPacReview as a columnist. Visit her author's website at www.eagle7haz.wix.com/mysite
Tanya Hazelton

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