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Lynching ‘despicable’ for thee, not for me. Busted Biden says it’s different when he said it since he’s sorry now.

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Former Vice President Joe Biden doubled down on his attack of President Trump for his “abhorrent” remarks about “lynching” even after he was called out for doing the same.

The 2020 Democratic presidential candidate apologized on Tuesday after having his hypocrisy exposed for having once used the term to describe the impeachment of former President Bill Clinton. He followed his apology with a tone-deaf repeat attack on Trump.

(Image: CNN screenshot)

Trump had lashed out earlier Tuesday in a tweet condemning the Democratic Party’s partisan impeachment inquiry as “a lynching.” He was immediately slammed for the alleged racial connotations in his choice of words as the left went into a full meltdown.

“Impeachment is not ‘lynching,’ it is part of our Constitution,” Biden tweeted in response. “Our country has a dark, shameful history with lynching, and to even think about making this comparison is abhorrent. It’s despicable.”

Not long after joining the frenzy over Trump’s remark, Biden was outed with a decades-old clip of himself using the same term to describe the House impeachment of Clinton.

“Even if the President should be impeached, history is going to question whether or not this was just a partisan lynching or whether or not it was something that, in fact, met the standard, the very high bar, that was set by the founders as to what constituted an impeachable offense,” Biden said in a CNN appearance in October 1998.

As his own words came back to haunt him, Biden eventually offered an apology later Tuesday night linking to the CNN report.

“This wasn’t the right word to use and I’m sorry about that,” the 2020 Democratic hopeful tweeted.

But he couldn’t leave it at that, following his so-called apology with a claim that Trump “chose his words deliberately.”

Biden was joined Tuesday by many of his Democratic colleagues who slammed the president while turning a blind eye to their own members.

Other House Democrats in 1998 had made similar remarks to those by then-Senator Biden, and many of their comments were unearthed Tuesday to show the double standards.

Rep. Gregory Meeks of New York had condemned Clinton’s impeachment on the House floor in 1998, calling it a “persecution” and a “political lynching.”

Washington Rep. Jim McDermott addressed his colleagues with a warning about the “political lynch” mob during that same time. “We are going to find a rope find a tree and ask a bunch of questions later.”

Democrat Rep. Danny Davis of Illinois called the imminent impeachment of Clinton a “lynching in the people’s House.”

New York Reps. Charles Rangel and Jerrold Nadler of New York had also used the term in condemning the Clinton impeachment process.

“I am the president’s defender in the sense that I haven’t seen anything yet that would rise, in my opinion, to the level of impeachable offense,” Nadler was quoted as saying in an Associated Press article from 2008. “In pushing the process, in pushing the arguments of fairness and due process, the Republicans so far have been running a lynch mob.”

The House Judiciary Committee, which is now chaired by Nadler, would be the committee that would consider any articles of impeachment against Trump.

Trump’s initial “lynching” comment was understood by some GOP lawmakers who spoke out in his defense, including Sen. Tim Scott, the Senate’s only black Republican.

“This is a lynching in every sense,” South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham told reporters Tuesday.

“It shows a lot of things about our national media when it’s about Trump who cares about the process,” he said. “As long as you get him — yeah, this is a lynching in every sense.”

Frieda Powers

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