Trump mocks conniving lovebirds Page, Strzok: ‘Lisa, Lisa, I love you!’

President Donald Trump drew raucous laughter from his supporters during a rally Thursday evening by mocking disgraced former FBI special agent Peter Strzok and former FBI lawyer Lisa Page.

But instead of merely poking fun at their disgraceful actions, he took a step further by imitating what their notorious text messages to each other must have sounded like.

“Peter Strzok, remember, he and his lover, Lisa Page?” the president’s comedic monologue at the Target Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota began. “What a group.”

Listen to the whole monologue below:


(Source: Fox News)

 

And then the imitations started.

“She’s going to win 10 million to one. She’s going to win. I’m telling you, Peter. I’m telling you, Peter, she’s going to win. Peter, oh I love you so much! I love you, Peter!” he said in mockery of Page.

“I love you too, Lisa! Lisa, I love you! Lisa, Lisa, oh God, I love you, Lisa! And if she doesn’t win, Lisa, we’ve got an insurance policy, Lisa. We’ll get that son of a bitch out. We got an insurance policy,”  he added in mockery of Strzok.

While those weren’t verbatim quotes by a long shot, they did accurately capture the duo’s concerns about then-Democrat nominee Hillary Clinton losing the 2016 presidential election and then-GOP nominee Donald Trump winning it.

“She just has to win now. I’m not going to lie, I got a flash of nervousness yesterday about Trump,” Page tweeted Strzok on July 27, 2016.

Later that same month, Strzok wrote to Page that he was “worried about what happens if [Clinton] is elected.”

Throughout the two’s sordid affair — which occurred during first the FBI’s bungled investigation into Clinton and then the bureau’s overreaching investigation into Trump’s campaign — the two spoke apprehensively about the 2016 election.

During one particularly disturbing exchange, Strzok wrote of an “insurance policy” against Trump’s potential victory. While the policy has never been explained, theories have emerged that he’d been working at the time to set up a contingency plan to essentially stymie Trump’s agenda were he to be elected president.

“Strzok wasn’t trying to prevent Trump from winning,” Fox News host Judge Jeanine Pirro speculated during an opening statement last summer. “What he was doing was even worse.”

“He was talking about having a plan to effectively disenfranchise the voters who elected Trump. Should Trump win, forget democracy, forget the people. Those voters who Strzok doesn’t like are idiots. He said so himself. In texts to his mistress.”

Listen:

In other words, the “insurance policy” was an attempted coup — one that the president argued Thursday is still ongoing.

“And we’re living through the insurance policy. That’s what it is. The phony Russia hoax,” he continued at the rally, referring to the long-wrung-out Russian collusion delusion conspiracy theory.

“Now the do-nothing Democrat con artists and scammers are getting desperate. 13 months,” he added, pivoting to the Ukraine hoax, which renowned centrist political commentator Tim Pool has dubbed “Russiagate 2:Ukranian Boogaloo.”

“They got to move fast, because they’re not beating us at the polls and they know it, despite the phony polls that you see all the time,” the president concluded in the clip above.

It’s believed by the president and his supporters that the Ukraine whistleblower non-scandal is a last-ditch effort by congressional Democrats to either remove Trump from office or, at the very least, hurt him enough in the polls to spur his potential defeat.

Much like the collusion conspiracy theory, the Ukraine hoax has been almost entirely debunked. The hoax centers around a whistleblower complaint alleging that the president had dangled a quid pro quo offer in Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky’s face to pressure him to investigate his potential 2020 rival, former Vice President Joe Biden, over credible allegations of corruption.

The quid pro quo, Democrats claim, was millions in military aid that the president temporarily withheld from Ukraine over the summer. However, the Ukrainian president has himself debunked this entire narrative multiple times, the latest of which occurred Thursday.

“Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky told reporters Thursday his controversial July call with President Trump involved no bribe, blackmail or quid pro quo, as impeachment-minded Democrats claim,” Fox News reported.

“Zelensky spoke at a daylong event with media inside a Kiev food market, and said he believes the transcript released by the White House is accurate and that he knew the U.S. had withheld $400 million in military aid due to concerns about corruption and concern for American ‘taxpayer money.’ But the issue, he said, was never linked to Trump’s desire that Kiev rekindle an investigation into an energy company with ties to former Vice President Joe Biden’s son, Hunter Biden.”

“There was no blackmail,” he said. “They blocked this money and nobody asked us [for] anything.”

Learn more below:

Yet just like the collusion conspiracy, the Ukraine hoax continues to be propagated by congressional Democrats and their media allies.

Why? Because, according to the president, it’s all part of the plan — one started by “lovebirds” Strzok and Page and since adopted by the rest of the conniving left:

Vivek Saxena

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

V. Saxena is a staff writer for BizPac Review with a decade of experience as a professional writer, and a lifetime of experience as an avid news junkie. He holds a degree in computer technology from Purdue University.
Vivek Saxena

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