Trump debuts in new online territory, and the left’s not happy about it

(Image: NBC News screenshot)

President Trump has sent the left into a tailspin over what they see as his invasion of the video-streaming giant, Twitch.

Trump’s Thursday night rally in Minneapolis, Minnesota was live-streamed using the Amazon-owned platform, following in the footsteps of other presidential candidates and politicians.

The site was originally a platform for users to stream themselves playing video games but has grown to include other interests, such as politically directed content, in an effort to reach the younger, tech-savvy audience. Trump has now joined Democratic presidential candidates Bernie Sanders and Andrew Yang on Twitch where they have held question and answer sessions with users.

Following the Minneapolis rally, Trump’s Twitch account is already up to nearly 53,000 viewers as of this writing and the video of Thursday’s event has been viewed over 50,000 on the site which also indicates that his campaign plans to broadcast next week’s rally in Dallas, Texas.

According to CNN:

Launched in 2011, Twitch is an online streaming platform that’s predominantly used to live stream video gameplay, though it also hosts live streaming of music, sports, talk shows and a range of other events.
It has substantially grown its video game streaming business since its debut, and Amazon (AMZN) purchased the service for $1 billion in 2014. The company says it has 15 million daily visitors and 1.3 million users at any one time.

 

The plan to focus on a heavy social media presence for the 2020 race follows the efforts made in 2016 when the Trump campaign used platforms such as Facebook effectively. And the president is already well-known on Twitter, where he has over 65 million followers.

Trump has frequently railed against Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, who owns Twitch as well as The Washington Post. The gamer platform came under scrutiny this week after thousands were able to watch a shooting near a German synagogue that was live-streamed on the site.

But while the president’s venture into the Twitch territory is a sign of his campaign’s push to gain a foothold in other social media platforms, many on the left did not welcome his addition to the streaming platform. There were some indications that the chat during the rally broadcast was being spammed by anti-Trump users who were writing “IMPEACH” in the comments as well as other remarks.

Others just took to Twitter to voice their discontent.

Others supported the president and advised the critics to “be better than the haters.”

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Frieda Powers

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