Kanye West’s ‘Sunday Service’: ‘Mental slavery’ if blacks blocked from supporting Trump

Rapper Kanye West’s support for President Donald Trump has not waned in 2019.

At a “Sunday Service” event in Salt Lake City, Utah, West spoke to a crowd of thousands about his support for the president and the negative effects of social media.

(Photo by SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

“They try to tell me because of my color who I’m supposed to pick as the president,” West said.

“You’re black, so you can’t like Trump,” he said he’s told by his critics — something the world has seen happen ever since West first publicly supported the president.

“I ain’t never made a decision only based on my color. That’s a form of slavery. Mental slavery,” West declared.

The Deseret News reported that between 7000 and 10,000 people attended West’s event. These “Sunday Service” events are hosted by the rapper on a weekly basis and include music and speeches from the man himself on everything from art to politics to religion. This Utah event took place during a two-day conference put on by the Church of Latter-day Saints.

West also urged the audience to keep away from the negativity on social media.

“Do not read comments on the internet. These people don’t know you like that. Social media is designed to make you think slower,” he said.

West’s words came after he performed his hit song “Jesus Walks.” The 42-year-old musician also spoke about the Republican Party and the history of slavery in the United States.

“That’s the Republican Party that freed the slaves,” he said.

He said his politics are his “right” to have.

“And we got the right, right? We got a right to our opinions, right?” he said.

This is not the first time West has spoken about conservatives being bullied over their beliefs.

“Liberals bully people who are Trump supporters,” he told David Letterman on the Netflix series “My Next Guest Needs No Introduction” in an episode aired in May.

West also said during the interview that he often sports a Make America Great Again hat in an attempt to break the cultural stigma surrounding supporting Trump.

“This is like my thing with Trump — we don’t have to feel the same way, but we have the right to feel what we feel,” he said.

West also talked about the “control” Democrats try to have over black people earlier this year on Twitter — he has been largely absent from social media for the majority of the year.

“They will not program me,” he tweeted. “Blacks are 90% Democrats That sounds like control to me.”

Despite artists openly calling for boycotts of conservatives in the entertainment industry, West has refused to back off his support for the president. He even visited the White House last year to discuss issues like prison reform and mental health services with the president.

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