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Teacher tells students Confederate flag is ‘white trash save the date card’ for marrying your sister

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A Georgia teacher was placed on administrative leave this week for sharing a racist, ahistorical lesson about the Confederate flag with her students at Hephzibah High School.

“Melissa Fuller’s daughter is a student at Hephzibah High School,” Augusta station WRDW reported Wednesday. “She said her daughter’s teacher put a picture of a Confederate flag on the board with text reading, ‘A sticker you put on the back of your pickup truck to announce that you intend to marry your sister. Think of it like a white trash “Save the Date” card.’

“She found it offensive, so she sent it to me and asked me what I thought,” Fuller said.

Fuller, in turn, chose to share it to Facebook, where the post quickly went viral, attracting hundreds of comments from parents and community members who shared her concerns.

“A lot of it is that it’s not morally correct. It’s unethical,” she said of the teacher’s Confederate flag lesson. “It’s just something you don’t want to discuss today in today’s world and especially inside of a classroom.”

“Why was that used?” she asked specifically of the teacher referring to people who like Confederate flags as “white trash.” “With it being such a rough area, why would you put that out there to a class discussion that could have turned very ugly?”

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(Source: WRDW)

It turns out Fuller’s daughter is herself a fan of the flag.

“Fuller said her daughter once wore a Confederate flag belt buckle to school. She said her daughter took it off after the school asked her to, but she still got an in-house suspension,” WRDW notes.

Does that make Fuller’s daughter “white trash?” Absolutely not.

The truth is that, despite propaganda from the far-left, the Confederate flag is not a racist symbol steeped in bigotry, hatred, and ignorance.

A CNN poll conducted in 2015 found that a 57 percent majority of Americans view the flag “more as a symbol of Southern pride than a symbol of racism.”

Included among these Americans is Byron Thomas, a black former University of South Carolina student who penned a column in 2015 detailing his love of the Confederate flag and bemoaning the hatred and bigotry he experiences for that love.

“I’ve been called ‘an Uncle Tom’ and ‘a sellout,’ and accused of despising my race,” he wrote. “Let me be clear: I love the skin that I am in. God gave me my skin color, but he also gave me freedom to think for myself and the right to stand by my beliefs. My skin color should not determine how I think, what I believe and what flags I hang in my home.”

He added that his love of the flag stems from his heritage.

“For me and many Southerners, the flag celebrates my heritage and regional pride,” he wrote. “One of my ancestors, Benjamin Thomas, was a black Confederate cook, and I do not want to turn my back on his service to the South. So I hang the flag in honor of his hard work and dedication to South Carolina during the Civil War.”

Note how Thomas wrote of being called “an Uncle Tom” and “a sellout.” The sort of malicious insults he faced from his hateful critics bears an uncanny resemblance to the insult that the teacher at Hephzibah High School chose to lob at her students.

Fuller maintained though that her goal hadn’t been to get the teacher in trouble. She just wanted to know what others thought of the teacher’s actions. Because her post went viral, however, the school eventually learned of it and responded by placing the teacher on leave.

“The Richmond County School System is committed to creating a diverse, equitable learning environment for all students,” the local school district said in a statement said. “The language used in the example was unacceptable and has no place in our classrooms.”

Social media users do not appear to be as forgiving as Fuller. They’ve responded to the controversy by, among other things, noting that teachers such as this are what’s wrong with the country’s ailing educational system.

Look:

Vivek Saxena

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