Mike Cernovich ‘consoles’ journo who lost his job for wrecking beer do-gooder: Own it, buddy!

(Image: Wikimedia)

Political commentator Mike Cernovich confronted “cancel culture” in an open letter to a Des Moines Register reporter who was fired this week over old tweets.

Register news writer Aaron Calvin had a taste of the devastating effects of the outrage culture when his “investigation” of old, negative tweets by Carson King triggered a backlash which cost him his own job. Cernovich penned his letter pointing out the inherent karma of his actions while encouraging him to “move on with your life.”

(Source: Twitter/carsonking2)

“I feel for you,” Cernovich wrote. “You had a dream to be a journalist, you worked at some smaller jobs, and you were rising up in your career. You were about to live your dream.”

“Your dream was killed, it’s a miserable feeling. You’re depressed and don’t want to leave bed,” he added before addressing the tweets that came back to haunt Calvin.

King, the 24-year-old Iowa resident who was at the center of the hit piece by the reporter, was thrust into the spotlight thanks to a viral video earlier this month of him holding up a sign at a “College GameDay” football game. Thanks to the attention, King ended up donating the $1 million raised to the University of Iowa’s Children’s Hospital.

But Calvin decided the feel-good story needed more and dug back to 2011 to find “offensive” tweets by the then 16-year-old high school student. King’s apology was not enough to stem the “cancel culture” outrage but Carson soon felt the heat when the mob demanded justice and uncovered his own not-so-saintly past. The left-wing reporter was summarily fired from The Register.

“I regret publishing that tweet now,” Calvin told BuzzFeed News where he was formerly employed.

“Because I was never trying to hold Carson to any kind of ‘higher standard’ or any kind of standard at all. I was trying to do my job as a reporter, and I think I did so to the best of my ability,” he said, adding that the incident “basically set my entire life on fire.”

“Yes there is a sort of karmic justice to what happened to you,” Cernovich told Calvin in his letter. “Your peers want to ruin lives, to destroy people, to show no mercy. You think this is War and you want to hurt people. You also believe you’re immune from any scrutiny for your own actions.”

He acknowledged that the reporter had a tough road ahead as he seeks to “rebuild” his life.

“It’s going to be hard as you’re not moved to the fringe or margins that you sought to place others,” he said, urging Calvin to “not give up. There are people who still love you, and even people like me who don’t love you do want to see you move on with your life.”

Cernovich noted, however, that the hard lesson is that “no one wins in Cancel Culture.”

“A lot of people are still angry at you, but those people are like your peers, who you need to reject. Reject this demonic cancel culture that seeks to make people homeless,” he advised. “You lost your job and maybe your career. What more do people want? Do they want you homeless, bankrupt, begging in the street? Where does it end?”

He directed the fired reporter to accept the role he played in promoting the “cancel culture” while urging him to keep a gratitude journal in the face of the “humiliation and trauma” of losing his job “in front of perhaps millions of people.”

“I wish we lived in a more forgiving society where you could find a new job after a few weeks. I wish we lived in a world where one Google result didn’t end your life,” Cernovich wrote.

“We don’t live in that world,” he added, “and you need to own your own responsibility for creating the world that you now live in personally.”

Frieda Powers

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