CNN’s nasty Acosta on Trump era: ‘I throw my beer cans at the TV’

Screengrab CNN

CNN chief White House correspondent Jim Acosta’s job is to cover President Donald Trump in a fair, objective manner, but the reporter is so obsessed with hating Trump he says he throws beer cans at the TV every time he sees the president on the screen.

It might be all that beer that’s influencing Acosta’s tirade.

Along with hating on Trump, the CNN reporter doesn’t think too highly of America either, referring to the United States as a “vicious, nasty country” while plugging his book at a Hill Center event with journalist Bill Press — a book that targets Trump.

“Do you remember, Bill, when we use to say ‘I’d like to leave this country better off to our kids and our grandkids?” Acosta said. “Does anybody say that anymore?”

 

His point of contention being that the president has referred to many in the media as the enemy of the people, this being the cabal that serves as the de facto campaign arm of the Democratic Party by putting their political agenda ahead of the truth.

“We have to ask ourselves, you know, it is relieving, it is cathartic to lash out at that guy on the TV screen,” Acosta said. “I throw my beer cans at the TV screen too, when they’re empty, from time to time.”

While listeners are left to assume he’s speaking proverbially, Acosta then unloads on the country itself.

“But I think we also have to take stock of what we’re doing at home,” the White House reporter continued. “What we’re doing in our communities. What’s happening in our daily lives that is contributing to this culture of just viciousness? We’ve become a vicious, nasty country.”

Proving that the liberal media elite lives in a bubble, Acosta then talked about how we are tearing ourselves apart, seemingly oblivious to the idea that the country is largely responding to the reporting they see from the likes of Acosta and his media cohorts.

“My concern is that we’re tearing each other apart,” he said. “And this is the country I love, too — my dad, as I said earlier, came over to this country from Cuba, came over here in 1962, three weeks before the Cuban missile crisis … moved to Northern Virginia, which is where I grew up.”

This led to the inevitable bashing of  Trump for opposing illegal immigration.

“My dad tells me this story that when he came to this country he was taken out of the classroom by a teacher who’d teach him to how to read and write English,” said Acosta. “There was a Presbyterian church in Vienna, Virginia, that gave my dad and my grandmother coats and sweaters so they could stay warm in their first winter here in the D.C. area. They had never been cold before.”

“Are we still that country anymore? Did John F. Kennedy call immigrants rapists and criminals back then? No.”

But Acosta has the facts wrong. Here’s what the president did say about some illegal immigrants coming to the U.S.: “They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists. And some, I assume, are good people. But I speak to border guards and they tell us what we’re getting.”

Tom Tillison

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

The longest-tenured writer at BizPac Review, Tom grew up in Maryland before moving to Central Florida as a young teen. It is in the Sunshine State that he honed both his passion for politics and his writing skills.
Tom Tillison

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