NY Times dreams with ‘End of GOP?’ — anti-American nightmare

WASHINGTON, DC - Surrounded by Democratic leadership and laughing about a President Donald Trump comment, House Democratic Minority Leaders Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) spoke to journalists after Speaker of the House Paul Ryan concerning the cancelled vote on the American Health Care Act which did not have enough votes for passage on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC Friday March 24, 2017. (Photo by Melina Mara/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
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The New York Times appears to believe that the Republican Party is poised to suffer such stinging defeats in the upcoming 2020 presidential elections that it’ll officially be dead afterward.

“The 2020 election will be transformative like few in our history,” one column published Tuesday in the Times by Democrat Party pollster Stanley B. Greenberg reads.

“It will end with the death of the Republican Party as we know it … [and] liberate the Democratic Party from the country’s suffocating polarization and allow it to use government to address the vast array of problems facing the nation.”

OK …

“Dare We Dream of the End of the G.O.P.?” reads the headline of another Times piece, this one written by in-house columnist Michelle Goldberg.

Goldberg is the same radically far-left columnist who was so distraught by President Donald Trump’s unexpected victory in 2016 that she began wearing a safety pin as a symbol of solidarity among members of the so-called “Resistance.”

“We need an outward sign of sympathy, a way for the majority of us who voted against fascism to recognize one another,” she proudly wrote at the time.

Three years later, she’s now partially convinced that Greenberg’s claims are accurate and that the Republican Party is indeed doomed. It’s ironic given as she’d felt the same way going into 2016.

“It sounds almost messianic: the Republican Party, that foul agglomeration of bigotry and avarice that has turned American politics into a dystopian farce, not just defeated but destroyed,” her latest piece reads.

“The inexorable force of demography bringing us a new, enlightened political dispensation. Greenberg foresees “the death of the Republican Party as we’ve known it,” and a Democratic Party ‘liberated from the nation’s suffocating polarization to use government to advance the public good.’ I’d like to believe it, and maybe you would too. But should we?”

While she never provides a clear-cut answer to her own question in the piece, that fact that she’s willing to even entertain the idea does seem to speak to how out-of-touch liberal so-called “elites” such as her have become.

Dovetailing back to March of 2017, only two months after Trump took office, renowned statistician Nate Silver warned at the time that the “liberal media bubble” was very real.

“Much of The New York Times’s coverage, for instance, implied that Clinton’s odds were close to 100 percent,” he wrote. “In an article on Oct. 17 — more than three weeks before Election Day — they portrayed the race as being effectively over, the only question being whether Clinton should seek a landslide or instead assist down-ballot Democrats.”

The lesson to be learned from the errors of 2016?

“Journalists should recalibrate themselves to be more skeptical of the consensus of their peers,” Silver’s analysis continued. “That’s because a position that seems to have deep backing from the evidence may really just be a reflection from the echo chamber.”

And yet two years later, the echo chamber appears to be alive and well. But something else appears to be occurring as well. Whereas in the past the Democrats plotted to simply defeat Republicans at the ballot box, these days it appears they’re pining for the party’s wholesale elimination. And not just by crushing Republicans at the ballot box — but by more sinister means as well.

Consider, for instance, the myriad examples of liberal Democrats demanding that people be arrested for questioning the theory of climate change or criticizing members of Congress — and that people be harassed publicly for working for the Trump administration, etc.

It’s as if Democrats want to eliminate one half of the country.

“Restrictions on immigration and abortion, conditions on welfare for the able-bodied, lower taxes and lower spending — these are not positions associated with the Democratic party. But millions of Americans, in some cases majorities and even large majorities, hold these views,” National Review’s Kevin Williamson noted in a column written this week in response to Greenberg and Goldberg’s pieces.

He went on to point out that even if the Republican Party were somehow eliminated, its roots would and will forever remain in American culture and society.

“They are entitled to political representation, irrespective of the future of the Republican party as an organization,” he wrote of those with conservative beliefs.

“And they will have that representation, whether it goes by the brand name Republican, Liberal, Whig, or Monster Raving Loony (RIP Screaming Lord Sutch). Eliminating the Republican party would not relieve the country of the ‘polarization’ — meaning opposition — that annoys the Goldberg-Greenberg camp.”

What remains unclear is to what lengths the left is willing to go to eliminate Republicans. Considering the recent spate of harassment, violence and vandalism against conservatives, the worry by some is that there’s no line the left won’t cross.

Vivek Saxena

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