‘Almost unbelievable’: Dr. Marc Siegel questions delayed autopsy, quick release of suicide watch for Epstein

grab from https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=187&v=JksdU_BJIuQ
Screen capture … Mark Steyn with Dr. Marc Siegel … Credit: Fox News

Joining Mark Steyn Monday on “Tucker Carlson Tonight,” Dr. Marc Siegel marveled at the odd circumstances leading up to the death of Jeffrey Epstein in his MCC jail cell on Saturday.

“It is unusual,” said Siegel, in response to a question about whether it is unusual for the autopsy results to be delayed. “It makes me wonder. The medical examiner has reportedly said that the cause of death, as Trace just said, is hanging. But they still have to determine exactly how that occurred and whether he actually hung himself. That would be one thing on my mind.”

“The other thing is, suicide is very, very common in prisons,” the doctor said. “It’s actually the number one cause of death in prisons. One out of three deaths in prison are suicides. But this particular facility has only had one suicide over the past 40 years.”

“I’ve been there. The Metropolitan Correctional Center is full of squalor, it’s full of vermin, it’s a disgusting place. It is not a pretty place at all,” Siegel pointed out.

“But the other question that has come up is where were the cameras? He was moved to special housing. Where was the observation? Why wasn’t he being observed? I can tell you that someone who had supposedly been on suicide watch, me as a physician, no psychiatrist would take a person off of suicide watch in this kind of condition, a sex offender. Take someone off of suicide watch and then just say, ‘Okay, he’s fine, he says he’s fine.’ That’s not how a psychiatrist would act.”

“Basically, six days after suicide watch, his suicidal tendencies cleared up,” said Steyn. “That’s the official position. That’s ridiculous from a medical perspective.”

“I have never seen that in all my years of practice,” Siegel declared. “It doesn’t happen. Suicide is something that comes along after a long period of time, severe depression, clearly had a shock here. It would not go away. No self-respecting psychiatrist would ever say, ‘Okay, he’s no longer suicidal.’ It lingers.”

Steyn went back to MCC’s excellent record of preventing suicides. “If you are a judge and you don’t want to give a guy bail and you want to send him to a jail where he is not going to commit suicide or not going to be able to commit suicide, this Manhattan Correctional Center has statistically about the best record in the country.”

“Which makes me wonder,” Siegel said. “Because listen Mark, you shouldn’t have the kind of bed sheets that you can hang yourself with. You could have paper bed sheets. You shouldn’t have anywhere that you can hang yourself from. Where are you hanging yourself from? The ceiling should be too high for that. You shouldn’t have the ability to do it on the side on a bed, on a door knob, on anything like that.

“Again, we have the ability these days to have the kind of technology to be observing,” he continued. “If he were in a psych ward, now we don’t have maximum security in a psych ward. If he were in a psych ward, the protocol says every 15 minutes, every single patient in a psych ward needs to be seen and examined. If it’s a suicide watch, it’s constant. So it’s clearly very, very unusual that he would be taken off of suicide watch, put in a room where he’s unobserved, and no cameras are pointed at him.”

“I should add that the number of suicides is highest among sex offenders and also homicides. Highest among sex offenders. They get targeted, they get beaten up, they get murdered, and they take their own lives,” said Siegel.

“This is almost unbelievable that this occurred,” he concluded.

Siegel is a practicing internist and an associate professor of medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center.

Video by Fox News

 

 

Comments

Latest Articles