Tucker Carlson: White supremacy hype is a ‘hoax’ … ‘It’s actually not a real problem in America’

Fox News host Tucker Carlson drew criticism from the left Tuesday after he stated that there is no epidemic of white supremacy motivated extremism in America — that this alleged epidemic that the left complains about daily is a “hoax” equivalent to the Russia collusion delusion conspiracy theory.

The remarks were made as he spoke about the left’s false claim that President Donald Trump has propped up and effectively endorsed white supremacy.

Listen:


Source: Fox News

“In point of fact, he never endorsed white supremacy or came close to endorsing white supremacy — that’s just a lie,” his statement on “Tucker Carlson Tonight” began. “But he condemned it anyway. Their response? He didn’t really mean it.”

But the whole thing is just a lie,”  he continued, getting to the core of his point.

“If you were to assemble a list, a hierarchy of concerns, of problems this country faces, where would white supremacy be on the list? Right up there with Russia, probably. It’s actually not a real problem in America. The combined membership of every white supremacist organization in this country would be able to fit inside a college football stadium. I mean, seriously.”

This is a country where the average person is getting poorer, where the suicide rate is spiking. ‘White supremacy, that’s the problem.’ This is a hoax. Just like the Russia hoax. It’s a conspiracy theory used to divide the country and keep a hold on power. That’s exactly what’s going on.

It doesn’t appear as if he dismissed the existence of white supremacy motivated extremism. It seems that he merely pointed out that, realistically speaking, more pertinent issues should take precedence, especially given that white supremacists represent a minority of the population.

In fact, a report from The Daily Beast, a left-wing outlet, published two years ago revealed that white supremacists comprise “less than 0.003 percent of the population.” Granted, this is an extremely dangerous “0.003 percent of the population,” which is perhaps why some members of the left, including CNN “journalist” Don Lemon, responded to Carlson’s remarks with exasperation.

Listen:

“Was that not the dumbest thing you’ve ever heard? … Listen, I don’t know how anybody could say that considering what happened this week. I want to look at the facts now, and his statement directly contradicts what the FBI director said,” Lemon said later Tuesday evening in response to Carlon’s commentary.

He went on to play a clip of FBI Director Christopher Wray testifying to Congress last month that Islamic terrorism and white supremacist terrorism are fairly equivalent in the threat they pose.

Just in the first three quarters of this year, we’ve had more domestic terrorism arrests than the prior year, and it’s about the same number of arrests we’ve had on the internal terrorism side,” he’d said. “And a majority of the domestic terrorism cases that we’ve investigated are motivated by some version of what you might call white supremacist violence.”

Lemon believes this disproves Carlson’s thesis. Does it, though? Maybe, maybe not. It does however certainly help highlight CNN’s hypocrisy.

During former President Barack Hussein Obama’s tenure in the White House, America was rocked by a spate of deadly Islamic-motivated terror attacks that, statistically speaking, outnumbered the attacks that were motivated by white supremacy, according to Areo, a left-leaning magazine:

(Source: Areo)

Yet in a 2015 monologue, Lemon’s colleague Brian Stelter appeared to dismiss concerns over the rise of Islamic terrorism as nothing but a “fearful, sometimes even xenophobic” overreaction.

“On Friday the 13th, ISIS struck the heart of Western culture, by hitting Paris, they hit home,” he said only days after the 2015 Paris attacks that left 131 victims dead. “And so, maybe predictably, much of the rhetoric on TV and the one the web has turned angry, fearful, sometimes even xenophobic. Fear is poison. Fear is a crippling poison.”

He seemed more critical of the response to the terror attack than the terror attack itself.

“You look at current polling that shows that many Americans, most Americans, more than 80% percent, believe there’s an imminent threat of a terrorist attack on U.S. soil. And yet, most of the time when those polls are conducted, there’s no attack afterwards. And that’s been true for years and years and years,” he added.

His point wasn’t a bad one. People were deathly afraid of Islamic terror attacks, when in reality such attacks were rare, though not nearly as rare as white supremacist motivated attacks.

His point seemed to be that this “crippling poison” of “fear” wasn’t good for Americans — that it was just ratcheting up unnecessary tension and stress at a time when, overall, life expectancy in the U.S. and throughout the entire global was at its highest in world history.

Returning to the Carlson’s program Tuesday on FNC, his guest, renowned scholar Victor Davis Hanson, kind of broached the same point by noting that, despite fear-mongering by the media, America is the most “racially intermarried and assimilated, integrated country in the world.”

“There is a reason why mostly a non-white population is trying to immigrate into a still-majority white population,” he said. “It’s not because we are racist. We are not stupid people. They are coming here because they understand that there’s more racial tolerance and opportunity and economic opportunity than ever before.”

Listen:

Should the left dismiss the existence of white supremacy and the threat it poses? Of course not. But should the rest abstain from fear-mongering over this concern? Arguably, yes.

Plus, it’d help if the left would stop incessantly putting out irresponsible, hyperbolic statements about how the president and the nearly 63 million Americans who voted him into office — including blacks, Hispanics, Asians, etc. — are white supremacist bogeymen who’re lurking underneath every person of color’s bed, ready to kill.

Vivek Saxena

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

V. Saxena is a staff writer for BizPac Review with a decade of experience as a professional writer, and a lifetime of experience as an avid news junkie. He holds a degree in computer technology from Purdue University.
Vivek Saxena

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