Cuomo halts Buttigieg’s race-baiting rhetoric about Trump: You poll at ‘almost 0%’ with African Americans

 

Perhaps this is one South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg should have sat out.

In Detroit ahead of this week’s Democratic primary debate, Buttigieg appeared on CNN to discuss President Trump’s tweets blasting Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md., for living conditions in his district — criticism jumped on by Democrats and their media allies as racist, because of the rhetoric used.

Buttigieg was only too happy to pile on Trump, calling the president “the divider-in-chief,” reaching to say that America is weaker because of Trump.

“It continues down this path of dividing Americans, black versus white, rural versus urban,” the mayor opined. “Which is exactly why America is becoming weaker as a country under this president each passing day.”

 

He said the presidency is supposed to be a symbol of something that we all have in common.

“Yet this president has taken every single opportunity to turn us against one another,” Buttigieg claimed.

Clearly, he hasn’t been paying attention to the intolerance on the left.

Buttigieg was led down a path about alleged racial components on Trump’s rhetoric, with the openly gay candidate agreeing that it’s racist.

“Look at the pattern,” he told CNN anchor Chris Cuomo. “This is a kind of terminology that he reserves for places and situations where there are a lot of minorities involved. We can debate over how strategic it is, how intentional it is, but on its face, it is racist.”

But Cuomo then sprang a trap on his guest.

“When we look at the polls that came out today from Quinnipiac… you struggle with African-Americans, literally, defined almost at 0%. Why?”

Without missing a beat, Buttigieg tried to chalk it up to being “new on the scene.”

“African-American voters are tired of having been lied to or taken for granted by politicians,” Buttigieg said. “And so, when you’re new on the scene, when you haven’t been known for years or decades, and when you’re not yourself from a community of color, you’ve got a lot of extra work to do in order to validate what you have to say and earn that trust.”

Give Cuomo some credit, as he mentioned the troubles Buttigieg has been having in his city with the black community.

His response was that being an urban mayor is “a journey, and a difficult one.”

Rep. Marcia Fudge, (D-Ohio,) former chairwoman of the Congressional Black Caucus, told The Daily Beast last month that Buttigieg had no support among blacks.

“Pete has a black problem,” Fudge insisted. “I don’t know of one black person out of Indiana that supports him.”

The harsh assessment came after a fatal shooting of a black man by a white South Bend police officer.

Reuters reported last month that while Buttigieg “boasts on the campaign trail about the economic transformation of South Bend during his seven years as mayor,” black residents in some areas feel left out.

Noting that U.S. Census Bureau data showed there are people in some black areas have become poorer since Buttigieg was elected, the news agency cited residents, local activists and city politicians who say he has failed to tackle economic and racial inequality in the city.

Yet, Buttigieg is happy to chase squirrels, as represented in the politically motivated narrative that President Trump is racist.

Tom Tillison

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