Beto’s claim America was ‘founded on white supremacy’ sparks heated battle on ‘The Five’

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While “The Five” co-hosts Jesse Waters and Juan Williams duke it out fairly frequently, rarely have their loud and fiery onscreen debates ever involved the sensitive topic of race.

That changed Wednesday, when the two traded verbal barbs over Democrat presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke’s claim that America was founded on so-called white supremacy.

During a roundtable discussion earlier this week with local immigrants and refugees in Nashville, Tennessee, the 46-year-old “manchild,” as some have called him, lectured the wannabe Americans about how much the country they aspire to join allegedly sucks.

“I know this from my home state, Texas, places that formed the Confederacy, that this country was founded on white supremacy,” he said. “And every single institution and structure that we have in this country still reflects the legacy of slavery and segregation and Jim Crow and suppression, even in our democracy.”

Listen:

Right off the bat early Wednesday evening on “The Five,” co-host Greg Gutfeld tore into O’Rourke for his “patronizing, slick, and elitist” attempt to use identity politics to drum up support.

“Right from the womb, we are all racist — it’s the new original sin, according to slender man,” he said. “Beto’s efforts to sow division only expand. He’s like a bitter divorced husband trashing the ex-wife. If he can’t be happy, no one can.”

“It used to be the politicians running for office had a number of tools at their disposal. Not Beto. He is the tool. Talk about a blunt object. His only function is to create victims out of brown and black Americans that they might look to him, the great white scarecrow, as their savior.”

Co-host Dagen McDowell agreed, adding, “You can’t practice identity politics if you have no personal identity. You can see the thought bubble over his head. When am I going to do when I’m done with this? Maybe I will become a dentist. Maybe I will learn how to eat use all gloom and make alpaca throws.”

It was when the discussion reached Williams that the tenor of the conversation changed dramatically.

“But let me just say I don’t think there’s any debate that what he said is true,” the left-wing co-host argued.

“Yes there is,” Gutfeld briefly interjected. “Our country was not founded on white supremacy. I would disagree. ”

He’s not the only one who disagrees with this left-wing line of thinking:

“I wouldn’t, because I would say the founders reserved the voting franchise for landowning white males. That was it. Dagen and Dana couldn’t vote. I know I couldn’t vote,” Williams said.

Waters took this moment to enter the conversation and sarcastically ask, “So was it founded on sexism too?”

“Yeah,” Williams replied.

“Pile it all on!” Waters retorted in exasperation.

“I’m not piling on,” Williams maintained. “To say this is the historical fact is piling on!? I’m just saying that’s the fact.”

And thus began the fight of the year.

Waters continued the discussion by arguing that even former President Barack Hussein Obama, a man whom some would say was the most anti-American president in American history, never spoke as negatively about America as O’Rourke has in recent days.

“Barack Obama didn’t even say that about our country,” he said. “He said the most beautiful, inspiring things about this nation’s founding. He didn’t get close to what you said or Beto O’Rourke. Any person who is going to run for president of this country never would say something like that.”

Williams disagreed.

“Anybody who knows American history would say that’s reality,” he argued. “The question is. … How can you disagree with the idea that the founding fathers said you’ve got to be a landowning white male?”

“Just because something happened at the time doesn’t define the founding,” Waters noted. “Just because people had slaves during the founding doesn’t mean we were founded on slavery and white supremacy.

Listen to the whole discussion below:

“Let me finish this point,” Williams replied. “I think the left sees this, and I think Beto O’Rourke’s reflecting that, and says let’s fix it. Let’s do something about this. I think the right, like you, refuses to even say that, you know what, that’s part of the original sin.”

“I acknowledged that there was slavery at the beginning, the founding of this country,” Waters replied in frustration. “I acknowledged that women or black Americans didn’t have certain rights. But Juan, 600,000 died in the Civil War to eradicate it. He said every institution in this country is racist!? The military!? The media!? The justice system? The culture? Everything is racist, Juan!? You don’t agree with that!”

Ah, but he does …

Like other members of the far-left, Williams doesn’t understand that America’s founding was based on the idea of self-governance, the idea of “liberty and justice for all” and the idea that all men are created equal.

While these ideas admittedly weren’t practiced correctly back in the late 1700s — as evidenced by the existence of slavery, among other things — they still are the cornerstones of America.

Moreover, they’re the reason why now, centuries later, millions of foreigners try yearly to immigrate to the U.S. either legally or illegally — because the very notions that defined America’s formation, and that leftists like Williams and O’Rourke seem to dismiss, are what have transformed it into one of the freest, greatest nations on Earth.

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