Every administration has asked some sort of census citizenship question besides Obama’s, argues Andy Biggs. Supreme Court missed ‘two things’ in decision

Rep. Andy Biggs appeared on Fox News’ “Sunday Morning Futures” to defend the idea of there being a citizenship question on the U.S. census.

Asked by Charles Payne about the Supreme Court’s recent decision to turn down a request to have a citizenship question on the U.S. census, Biggs injected a little common sense into the ongoing conversation by saying that a citizenship question is not entirely out of left field.

(Screenshot from Fox News’ “Sunday Morning Futures”)

“I think the Supreme Court missed at least two things [on this issue],” Biggs said. “Number one is the purpose of the census. It’s an enumeration for creating congressional districts. That’s article one, section two. That’s just as basic as it gets.”

The congressman continued, “And then the second thing that I think they missed is the historical context of this, as well. Every administration had included some kind of nationality or country of origin question except for the Obama administration in 2010.”

He added that the Obama administration was the only administration to nix the nationality question, but even they continued asking it on annual census surveys.

“But even President Obama’s administration, for the annual census estimate surveys that they were doing —  they asked that question,” Biggs said.

This historical context, argues Biggs, is why accusations of a citizenship question being “discriminatory” or a “problem” are “wrong.”

Biggs also argued that not asking a citizenship question does not allow for the actual citizens of a district to get the best representation they can. By allowing non-citizens to include themselves among citizens, Biggs said actual citizens end up with “less representation.”

Check out part of Biggs’ appearance on “Sunday Morning Futures” below:


Source: Fox News

People seem to agree with Biggs as a recent Economist/YouGov poll found that most people approve of a citizenship question being on the census.

Of the 1500 people polled, 53 percent of them said they wanted a question about American citizenship on the 2020 census, while 32 percent of people said that the question should not be asked. Another 14 percent of people were undecided on the question.

Besides public support and appropriate historical context, a citizenship question on the census is also not something that would be exclusive to America. As some supporters have pointed out recently, Canada has asked a citizenship question since 1901. Are there any leftists out there protesting the evil injustices of Canada and their “woke” leader Justin Trudeau?

Though the Supreme Court turned down the citizenship question in the form it was recently submitted, President Trump has promised that the fight is not over.

“The News Reports about the Department of Commerce dropping its quest to put the Citizenship Question on the Census is incorrect or, to state it differently, FAKE! We are absolutely moving forward, as we must, because of the importance of the answer to this question,” he tweeted this week.

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1146435093491277824

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is among the politicians who believe a citizenship question suggests “racism” and is born from a “very disturbing history.”

The New Yorker asked if there was “racist intent” behind the question in their coverage of the story.

The ACLU has also argued that the question is racist and is only an attempt to give more power to Republicans.

In all of these criticisms, however, notice that historical context, facts, etc. mean virtually nothing. If the question is so racist, why is it only a problem in America when Trump is president? That logic simply does not hold up.

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