Trump’s rape accuser brags about sexually harassing Roger Ailes: ‘It never stopped. I’d ask him to twirl for me’

grab from https://youtu.be/zi4DSmdUdng and https://youtu.be/lHYa9IupxRs
Screen captures … E. Jean Carroll, Roger Ailes … Credits: Hoover Institution, New York Magazine

It’s a pretty safe assumption that creating strong demand for her pending new book is the goal, and so the evidently crazy E. Jean Carroll is in actuality crazy like a fox. The latest tale she is telling, this time to Vanity Fair, is that she “sexually harassed” Roger Ailes while she had a show on his cable channel America’s Talking.

“Oh, I did it. Every day I had a chance,” Carroll said. “I call him the pearl of his sex. Right on the air. I roll up my trouser legs. I would wait for the camera to come over. Then I would slowly pull up the right and then the left trouser leg. It would say Roger Ailes. I would say, “He’s my future husband.” It never stopped. I’d ask him to twirl for me. I adored him.”

Carroll is the advice columnist who has fancifully accused Donald Trump of raping her in a department store dressing room in the mid 1990s and called rape “sexy” in a CNN interview that Anderson Cooper promptly shut down when she started to go down that road.

‘This story is officially over’: CNN’s Cooper can’t cut fast enough as Trump accuser likens rape to sexy ‘fantasies’

Carroll is a satirist, and her new book “What Do We Need Men For? A Modest Proposal” is said to be a memoir, told as if journeying across America on a road trip, while creating a “Most Hideous Men of my Life List.”

An Elle advice columnist for the past 26 years, she told Vanity Fair that the answers she provides to a wide range of questions she receives usually boil down to “get rid of him.”

The magazine reveals that there are 21 hideous men on Carroll’s list, to include Trump and former TV executive Les Moonves, who she says groped her in an elevator. Trump and Moonves have both denied her accusations.

Carroll said that she added Ailes to the list when the allegations of sexual harassment surfaced in 2016.

Asked about the CNN interview that suddenly ended when she said that people associate “rape” with sexiness, she said: “You know, somebody explained it much better than me. Joy Behar explained it. She went on ‘The View’ and got into an argument and she was defending my vision of the word ‘rape’ being filled with sexual imagery. And fantasy connotations. She said everyone here has seen ‘Gone With the Wind.’ She said, you know when Rhett Butler grabs Scarlett O’Hara and picks her up and carries her up the stairs? She’s fighting him. She is slugging his chest, and he is going to take her and he’s going to throw her down. They cut to a scene of her in bed as happy and rosy, and fulfilled as any woman. And many women have this fantasy. Nora Ephron. She’s written about it. Having her clothes ripped off by a group of men. The only way she changed that fantasy was she was wearing different outfits. It is a female and a male fantasy.”

The Vanity Fair interviewer asked Carroll what it has been like going from living a “pretty private life to being very much in the public eye. What has this been like?”

“Fabulous. Buoyant, she exclaimed. “It’s almost merry because of the support when I walk down the streets. It is incredibly heartwarming. I’ve been getting messages. I don’t read Twitter now. I’ve been off it, which is a miracle because I always would check Twitter, but I’m staying off. Many times [strangers on the street] don’t know what to say and they grip my arm, or they burst into tears, or they say, ‘I had a story. I couldn’t tell it. Thank you.’ … As I was talking to somebody on the phone yesterday, a man just stood in front of me bowing as I talked on the phone. It was amazing. It was like he was standing in front of Queen Elizabeth.”

 

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