I’m the one at a ‘disadvantage’: Trans athlete say he must work ‘twice as hard’ to compete against women

After Craig Tefler decided to be CeCe Tefler, the athlete won the 400-meter women’s hurdles at the NCAA Division II outdoor track-and-field championships.

Tefler, who attends Franklin Pierce University, won by more than a second over his nearest competitor last month — a lifetime in track — yet the transgender collegiate athlete claims he’s at a disadvantage in competing against women.

In an interview on the liberal sports network ESPN titled, “Telfer encourages others to live their best authentic life,” the women’s champion said he/she has to work “twice as hard.”

“If anything, me competing against cis gender females is a disadvantage, because my body is going through so many medical implications,” Telfer said “It’s going through biochemistry changes. So, being on hormone replacement therapy … your muscle is deteriorating, you lose a lot of strength because testosterone is where you get your strength, your agility and all your athletic stuff.”

“I have to work twice as hard to keep that strength,” he/she continued. “If I slack a day, that’s like three days set behind. So, I have to keep up my workouts. I can’t drink, I can’t eat unhealthy because it’s going to impact me harder.”

 

For comparison, in January 2018, the last time Telfer competed as Craig, he finished eighth in a field of nine in the Men’s 400 meters at the Middlebury Winter Classic in Vermont.

To get an idea of just how far Telfer advanced in the sport competing as a woman, the website LetsRun.com detailed his rankings since 2016 below.

Robert Johnson broached the topic in a column for Let’sRun.com, writing:

“The fact that Telfer can change her gender and immediately become a national champion is proof positive as to why women’s sports needs protection,” wrote Robert Johnson in a Let’s Run article.

Not that Franklin Pierce University isn’t proud of their new “champion” student.

And this may be just the beginning of biologically males smashing records while competing as women, coming in an age where being one’s “authentic self” means you can pick the gender you want to be, regardless of birth.

As crazy as that may sound, amid all the controversy over his performance, Telfer said that he takes hormone suppressors and that makes him “the crazy one” for competing against women.

Photo Source Franklin Pierce University

“That’s another disadvantage,” he told ESPN’s Ryan Smith. “Cis women are producing more testosterone than the average trans female.”

(Cis women is how the left refers to normal women.)

‘So it’s crazy! I’m the crazy one, to be the weakest female, the weakest link in the chain, to be competing against the top ones,” Telfer continued, with a straight face. “I should be fingered as the stupid one, for wanting to do that in the first place.”

Conservative activist Candace Owens commented on Telfer’s story to say feminists are “setting women’s progress in sports back a hundred years.”

“Okay, to a man, you can be mediocre at sports and you can dominate this category, thanks to feminism,” Owens said.

And expect more of the same, as the International Olympic Committee ruled earlier this year transgender athletes can compete in the Olympics and international events.

The news guidelines say female-to-male athletes can compete “without restriction,” while male-to-female athletes must undergo hormone therapy.

 

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