Wolff defends new ant-Trump book in bizarre interview: ‘Even if I was wrong, I’m not going to admit it to you’

It’s hard to take Michael Wolff seriously at all these days, but the discredited author is still making his rounds across mainstream media as he promotes his latest book “Siege: Trump Under Fire.”

A followup to “Fire and Fury,” “Siege” is about as challenged in its facts as Wolff’s first book on the president.

(Photo by Jared Siskin/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images)

In an interview with the Yahoo News podcast “Skullduggery,” Wolff seemed surprised to be challenged on the accuracy of his book and he lashed out in a rather childish way.

Host Michael Isikoff first set off Wolff by pointing out a fairly minor mistake in the book.

Isikoff asked Wolff about the book saying Associate Attorney General Rachel Brand was nominated by President Trump and not Barack Obama.

“Even if I was wrong, I’m not going to admit it to you,” Wolff strangely responded.

Isikoff did not back down and next asked Wolff why the indictment at the center of his book is named something different than what all other Department of Justice documents name it.

“Maybe not draft indictments, maybe not this, I don’t know,” Wolff said. “All I am doing is quoting from two things — a document given to me by an incredibly authoritative source, and that two, on the face of it, that is incredibly convincing.”

Another point Isikoff made sure to ask Wolff about was a claim from “Siege” that Robert Mueller had been handcuffed in his kitchen for hours the day his office was searched by the FBI. Mueller was not actually charged with anything that day, so the handcuffs seem abnormal and against regular police procedure.

“I have no idea on the basis on which someone is handcuffed,” Wolff said, basically admitting he was burping out hot air during the interview. “I know that the description of the scene that was given to me, again, a very good source on this, had him sitting in the kitchen in handcuffs.”

Isikoff later directly challenged Wolff’s honesty, which made the author quite livid.

“You get all these things wrong and then you ask us to trust you,” Isikoff said to Wolff.

“No, you get these things wrong,” Wolff replied.

He continued by saying, “This critique is bulls***!”

Wolff claimed at one point that no real research was needed for his books since he could get the information straight from high-level sources that others do not have access to. If his sources are getting things wrong, that’s nothing for Wolff to hide behind. That would also make him what he is: a terrible journalist.

“I know these people,” Wolff said. “I have an access here that most other people involved in this story do not have.”

Wolff makes plenty of claims in his new book, but none are worth reprinting here. What’s important about Wolff is how clearly he shows the effects of Trump Derangement Syndrome. He is a “journalist” who openly pushes away facts when his narrative is challenged.

To make matters worse, many leftists have celebrated him. He may be more recognizable as a clown these days, but “Fire and Fury” was a bestseller and its challenged pages were even read by celebrities during a telecast of the Emmy Awards.

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