PBS cartoon ‘Arthur’ introducing gay character shows a serious ‘war for our culture,’ says Seb Gorka in fiery rant

PBS’ long-running kids cartoon “Arthur” earned a fair amount of controversy when its most recent season premiere revealed one of the program’s characters to be gay. The episode even ended in a gay wedding attended by the show’s main characters, third-grade students Arthur, Francine, Buster and Muffy.

“Arthur,” which follows the educational adventures of Arthur Read and his friends and family, has aired over 200 episodes since premiering in 1996, but its storyline latest seemed a little out of place. Arthur and his friends spend the majority of the episode trying to find a match for their teacher, Mr. Ratburn. Ratburn surprises everyone when he ends up marrying Patrick, a local chocolatier.

(Photos by Screenshot/Alex Wong/Getty Images)

“Mr. Ratburn is married, I still can’t believe it,” Arthur says.

“Yup, it’s a brand-new world,” his friend Francine then announces.

“PBS Kids programs are designed to reflect the diversity of communities across the nation,” Maria Vera Whelan, the senior director of marketing, communications and social media for children’s media and education at PBS, said in a public statement. “We believe it is important to represent the wide array of adults in the lives of children who look to PBS Kids every day.”

While some praised the episode for its attempt at inclusivity, others accused it of trying to brainwash children.

Sebastion Gorka, the former Deputy Assistant to the President in the Trump administration, said the move by PBS and the makers behind “Arthur” shows that there is a “war for our culture” currently going on and people need to be paying attention.


Source: Fox News

“That’s been the left from Robespierre to Trotsky to Marcuse to Alinsky to Clinton to Obama to today,” Gorka said on his Salem Radio Network show “America First” in reaction to the new “Arthur” episode. “Civil society doesn’t exist, friendship doesn’t exist, family doesn’t exist — only permanent revolution.”

Gorka said the story decision was inappropriate as “Arthur” is a children’s program.

“Have you seen what I’ve posted on my Twitter feed, with regards to family? Arthur is a children’s cartoon. I think it’s actually made with your money, PBS,” he said.

Gorka said his own kids watched “Arthur” years ago, but they have since tuned out. Gorka said the series has changed quite a bit from a show “about a rodent-like creature that lived and had fun in his cartoon world.”

Gorka continued by saying that this political push by PBS and the long-running and popular “Arthur” series is confirmation of the culture wars currently at play in America.

“Did you have any questions about there being a culture war, ladies and gentlemen?” Gorka said. “Did you have any doubt in your mind? This is a war for our culture, and that’s why we exist here, on ‘America First,’ on the Salem Radio Network.”

PBS previously pulled an episode of the “Arthur” spinoff series “Postcards from Buster” when a lesbian mother couple were shown. Pulling the 2005 episode did not sit well with “Arthur” creator Marc Brown at the time.

“What we are trying to do in the series is connect kids with other kids by reflecting their lives,” Brown said in a public statement at the time. “In some episodes, as in the Vermont one, we are validating children who are seldom validated. We believe that ‘Postcards From Buster’ does this in a very natural way — and, as always, from the point of view of children.”

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