AOC goes atypically silent when asked about supporting Venezuela’s socialist Maduro regime

(File Photo: screenshot)

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez uncharacteristically offered no opinion on a question about supporting the Nicolas Maduro regime in Venezuela.

The New York Democrat, who has had no trouble spouting off her views on many subjects she knows little about, was silent on whether the Maduro regime is legitimate, punting a question about her thoughts and deferring to her party’s leadership.

(File Photo: screenshot)

The National Review‘s John McCormack asked the outspoken democratic socialist about the uprising in Venezuela with socialist dictator Maduro attempting to maintain control in the face of angry citizens declaring National Assembly president Juan Guaidó as president of the country.

McCormack highlighted the divide among Democrats in response to the crisis, as President Trump declared that the U.S. recognized Guaidó as the democratically elected president of Venezuela, while several Democrats lined up with Russia, China, Cuba, and others to side with Maduro.

Ocasio-Cortez’s freshman colleague in the House of Representatives, Rep. Ilhan Omar, laid the blame for the nation’s chaos squarely on the U.S. in an amazing take on how “policies that we have put in place has kind of helped lead the devastations in Venezuela.”

But while Ocasio-Cortez has normally backed Omar and her views, she avoided answering the direct question with a direct answer in the National Review interview.

According to McCormack:

So far, Omar hasn’t been joined even by other members of the far-left wing of the Democratic party, many of whom have offered a muted response to the Venezuelan uprising. “Violence is horrible,” Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez tells NR when asked to comment on the situation. When pressed on whether the Maduro government is legitimate or Guaidó deserves U.S. support, she adds that she’ll “defer to caucus leadership on how we navigate this.”

 

Since Maduro has refused to leave office protests have turned violent, with government security forces clashing with citizens – even, as some footage revealed, driving into crowds of citizens demonstrating in the streets.

Nancy Pelosi tweeted that “Maduro needs to acknowledge the will of the Venezuelan people.”

Former vice president and Democratic 2020 hopeful, Joe Biden, tweeted that “Maduro’s regime is responsible for incredible suffering,” calling for the U.S. to support Guaidó.

But the failure of Ocasio-Cortez to take a clear position when she has had no trouble weighing in on other topics surprised many on social media. Deferring to the “caucus leadership” also seemed uncharacteristic to many who have witnessed the freshman congresswoman frequently disagreeing with – and vocally calling out – the party’s establishment.

She infamously called herself “the boss” a few weeks after taking office, dismissing members of her own party who were critical of her Green New Deal.

“You know what? I don’t care anymore. I don’t care anymore, because again, I’m at least trying, and they’re not. So the power is in the person who’s trying, regardless of the success. If you’re trying, you’ve got all the power, you’re driving the agenda, you’re doing all this stuff,” she said in a town hall event in February.

“And I’m like you try, you do it. Because you’re not. So until you do it, I’m the boss. How about that?” she said.

The disparity between her previous vocal outbursts and her silence on Venezuela raised plenty of eyebrows on Twitter.

Frieda Powers

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

Originally from New York, Powers graduated from New York University and eventually made her way to sunny South Florida where she has been writing for the BizPacReview team since 2015.
Frieda Powers

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