‘Forced down our throat’: Watch Colo. farm kid own lib Governor with list of policies jolting state to the left

(File Photo: screenshot)

Colorado Governor Jared Polis stood silently while a high school student delivered a scathing lecture about the terrible job he has done leading the state.

The far-left Democrat was called out at a meet-and-greet last week in Fort Morgan where he met with local government officials, members of the oil and gas industry as well as Morgan County agriculture producers, according to Fort Morgan Times.

(Video: YouTube)

County residents and protesters expressed their disapproval of the governor’s administration with several in attendance holding up “Recall Polis” signs.

During an open question-and-answer segment, Ky Chapman rose to speak and delivered a long list of policy decisions by Polis that he opposed, telling the governor that the people of the state were not happy with him and were “dumbstruck about what you’ve done.”

The high school student explained that he’d grown up on a farm in the area before digging into Polis’ record on issues ranging from the national popular vote bill, his support of the “red flag bill” and an oil and gas bill.

“As you may be aware, we Coloradans are not happy with you but I’d just like you to listen to me for three minutes; this isn’t all going to be about agriculture,” Chapman began.

He blasted the governor’s support of a bill awarding Colorado’s electoral votes to the winner of the national popular vote, calling it “extremely disgusting that this bill was passed without a vote from us Colorado citizens.”

“The Electoral College was created to protect our state’s voice compared to states like California and New York, and news flash: we have different values from them,” he said. “Our voice is wiped out by their massive populations, and it is extremely, extremely ironic that we didn’t even get a chance to vote on this but instead was forced down our throat.”

The student slammed the “utter nonsense” of the “red flag bill” which allows family members or law enforcement to petition a court to remove firearms from someone who is considered a danger to themselves or others. Chapman called out Polis for signing the bill “despite 76 percent, or 48 out of 63 counties and sheriffs in the state opposing it.”

“Why should someone with a previous or current relationship to me be able to call the sheriff’s office and tell them that they can come take my guns? This has already turned deadly in Maryland and I can guarantee you it will become deadly in Colorado. This will hurt law-abiding citizens and put both the public and officers in danger. There is no way that this bill is going to make Colorado safer,” Chapman argued.

The teenager went on to address “by far the most important issue for Coloradans,” an oil and gas bill that defied the will of the people who had defeated Proposition 112 last November.

“Now this bill has another layer of red tape getting permits and certifications as well as getting local counties and communities chances to regulate the industry however the hell they want,” Chapman said, accusing the Democrat of ruining the lives of many in the state. “You punched Coloradans directly in the nose after we chose a different path last fall.”

The student took a momentary turn away from local politics to slam the governor’s “pathetic” response to the Easter Sunday attack on Christians in Sri Lanka.

“Those Catholic and Christians who were murdered in Sri Lanka aren’t Easter worshipers, but persecuted Christians by radical extremist Islamic terrorists. I guess you’d rather not offend a bunch of terrorist murderers by calling them radical Islamic terrorists but instead be extremely ignorant and call Christians ‘Easter worshipers,'” he said, referring to a statement by Polis which followed along the lines of many Democrats who refused to use the word ‘Christian’ when discussing the tragic attacks last month which killed over 250 people.

Chapman concluded by addressing the removal of a tax exemption from the state budget for fertilizers.

“As someone who lives on a farm, this is going to have a greater impact than you believe,” he said. “We aren’t rich, and this is going to have a huge impact on our operations and many others.”

“Time after time you’ve attacked each industry in this state, and all while doing so you say you want to be a governor for all. Yet all we’ve seen you do is be a governor for Boulder,” the student said in closing, and was met with cheers and applause.

The far-left governor acknowledged Chapman’s remarks with a comment on the “great civic education” that the student was engaged in, offering to write a note to his teacher. He then went on to give a generalized response on his administration’s stand on several of the issues raised.

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