Don Lemon coins news phrase, ‘white terrorism,’ says people are ‘afraid to talk’ about it

CNN featured Rabbi Joshua Stanton Saturday evening to react to the shooting at a synagogue in Poway, California, that claimed one life and left three others wounded.

Conveniently for the anti-Trump network, the rabbi spoke about the right politician mainstreaming hate and a rise in hate crimes by “people who I fear are radicalized based on white supremacist ideology.”

Stanton said all communities, to include the Jewish community, “unfortunately now do live in fear of domestic terrorism and white supremacist hate.”

With network anchor Don Lemon having already declared white men “the biggest terror threat in this country,” the rabbi was singing from a familiar choir book and his words prompted Lemon to coin what seems to be a new term: “white terrorism.”

 

That’s correct, domestic terrorism is being accredited to the white race by the black CNN anchor, who said people are “afraid” to talk about it.

“Rabbi, let’s have the conversation that many people fear… and you, you went there,” Lemon said. “We talked about terrorism and domestic terrorism — white terrorism — in this country, people are… people are afraid to talk about it and if you talk about it you’re deemed racist or you’re un-American.”

Clearly, Lemon has no qualms with being called a racist — likely a reflection of the job security he has on the liberal network.

And he was just getting warmed up.

Commenting on when “they” believe it’s Muslim terrorism, Lemon said, “Quick to respond, quick to profile a Muslim.”

He wasn’t clear on just who “they” are, but he went on to talk about the “desperately needed” conversation on how to profile a white person.

“I was having this conversation as I was coming to the studio, how do you profile the average person who may not look like their Muslim — they may not be dark-skinned, they may just, you know, be a brown haired guy you may just see at the supermarket.

“How do you do that and why is it so difficult for us to have that conversation, which is desperately needed.”

Stanton cited a Anti-Defamation League study to say the “overwhelming majority” of domestic terrorists incidents over the last year “were committed by people inspired by white supremacist hate.”

They went on to detail the increase in hate crimes, but the underlying objective in the so-called reporting was clear — associating the reported increases to President Trump being in the White House.

The trouble being that the left not only controls what constitutes a hate crime, but is also reporting on them — actor Jussie Smollett ring a bell?

With a widening of the parameters and an increase in the agencies counting, the end result is an overall increase and people like Don Lemon prompting you to believe our biggest terrorist threat in America is from white people.

Propaganda 101.

And while not naming Trump, the rabbi made sure the target of his remarks was not lost on anyone when CNN anchor Alisyn Camerota asked about white supremacists having “found each other and feel licensed” to be so bold.

“I fear that politicians have brought hate mainstream in normalizing the rhetoric,” Stanton said, before misrepresenting Trump’s comment about good people being on both sides of the debate over Confederate statues. “In normalizing the language and saying there are good people on both sides after Charlottesville and in failing to stop everything when a house of worship is under attack. To stop everything and just be present with those in mourning.”

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