Hillary Clinton says Mueller report is ‘not the end’ and discusses Trump impeachment

Hillary Clinton is claiming that the Mueller report should have been enough to indict someone for obstruction of justice.

During the Time 100 Summit on Tuesday, Clinton claimed that Donald Trump has not been indicted from the Mueller report simply because he is the president.

(Photo by Roy Rochlin/Getty Images)

“I think there’s enough there that any other person who had engaged in those acts would certainly have been indicted,” said Clinton. “But because of the rule in the Justice Department that you can’t indict a sitting president, the whole matter of obstruction was very directly sent to the Congress.”

The former secretary of state said Mueller’s report “could not have been clearer” and that Congress should continue investigating the president for obstruction. She did, however, say that it’s too early to be calling for impeachment, as multiple Democrat lawmakers are currently doing. Clinton said Congress should investigate “based on evidence” and without the bias of a “preordained conclusion.”

She did add, though, that Trump should be impeached if Congress’ investigation reveals crimes worthy of that punishment.

“If at that point they believe high crimes and misdemeanors have been committed, then I think it is the obligation of the Congress to put forward articles of impeachment,” said Clinton.

She went on to say that the Mueller report is only the “beginning,” a grueling sentiment many tired of endless investigations leading nowhere are no doubt not buying into.

“I’m really of the mind that the Mueller report is part of the beginning,” Clinton said. “It’s not the end.”

In a very different interview at the Time 100 Summit, Senior White House Advisor Jared Kusher, who is also the president’s son-in-law, said the Mueller investigation was more damaging to the country than anything Russia was guilty of doing during the 2016 presidential election.

“When you look at what Russia did, buying some Facebook ads and trying to sow dissent, it’s a terrible thing,” said Kushner. “But I think the investigations and all of the speculation that’s happened for the last two years has a much harsher impact on our democracy than a couple Facebook ads.”

The president tweeted Kushner’s words and posted the video of his son-in-law at the summit. Trump called Kushner’s time on stage as a “great interview.”

Clinton and Kushner’s words obviously exemplify both sides in a controversial debate that still rages, despite Mueller’s investigation being done and no evidence of collusion by the Trump campaign — the whole point of the investigation — being found.

The fact that Clinton would call a two-plus year investigation that literally led nowhere and wasted millions of dollars “the beginning” is sad and shows just how spiteful she is against the man who defeated her in 2016.

The president answered allegations of obstruction in a recent tweet where he said he had the power to fire Robert Mueller at any time but never did, thus allowing the man to continue his investigation.

“I had the right to end the whole Witch Hunt if I wanted. I could have fired everyone, including Mueller, if I wanted,” tweeted Trump. “I chose not to. I had the RIGHT to use Executive Privilege. I didn’t!”

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