Cory Booker suddenly admits: ‘We do have a problem at the southern border’

DES MOINES, IOWA - APRIL 16: Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ) speaks to guests during a Black Caucus Reception hosted by the Iowa Democratic Party at the Polk County Central Senior Center on April 16, 2019 in Des Moines, Iowa. Earlier in the day Booker hosted a “Coffee With Cory” event in Carroll, Iowa. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
(FILE PHOTO by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

In a stunning but not unprecedented reversal, on Tuesday Democrat presidential candidate Sen. Cory Booker finally admitted that a crisis exists along the southern U.S. border. He even urged his fellow peers in the far-left Democrat Party to stop denying this indisputable reality.

“We do have a problem at the southern border,” he said at a campaign event in Iowa. “Democrats should not deny that we [do]. Nations should have borders, borders should be respected.”

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This statement marked somewhat of a reversal from what he’d said in February.

If there’s any emergency at the border, it’s the one he created, the crisis he created,” he’d said in an interview with reporter Paul Steinhauser, referring to President Donald Trump. “If there’s any crisis, you see it in humanitarian issues about separating families, caging children and more.”

Trump hasn’t caged children. Former President Barack Hussein Obama did, however.

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Continuing his statement Tuesday, the 2020 contender claimed that his issue isn’t with whether or not a crisis exists — which seems disingenuous, given his previous use of the word “if” — but rather with how the president has been attempting to resolve the crisis.

“[M]y beef with this president is that, number one, his technologies don’t work. I’ve gone down to the border, I’ve hung out with [Customs and Border Protection] and other border patrol folks and they’re like, ‘There’s no way we need a wall coast to coast,'” he said.

While this may be true, there are plenty of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials and U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents who’ve said the exact opposite.

“In fact, talk about government taking things from you,” the senator concluded. “Even to build that wall, we’d have to take land from many landowners now that don’t want to give up acres of their land for a wall. We have a time now where you can use sensors and technologies and drones and a lot more to protect the border, which is what we should do.”

Eminent domain wouldn’t necessarily by a concern. First, the president’s goal isn’t to build a wall “coast to coast” but rather to fortify the weakest parts of the southern U.S. border. Therefore, not everybody who owns property along the southern border would be affected.

HERE’S WHAT YOU’RE MISSING …

Second, plenty of landowners along the border do want a wall. Included among them is Jim Chilton, an Arizona rancher who’s frustrated by the endless stream of mostly illegal alien men (some of them possible terrorists) crossing through his border-adjacent land.

“Mr. President, we need a wall. I would say we need a wall all around all the length of the border,” he said in January at the Farm Bureau Federation’s 100th Annual Convention in New Orleans.

“We’ve got to stop the drug-packers bringing drugs in to poison our people, and I would say to Speaker Pelosi, walls are not ‘immoral,’” he added, alluding to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s proclamation at the time that the construction of a wall would amount to an “immorality.”

“In fact, I have traveled around the world. The biggest wall I’ve ever seen is around the Vatican. Now, you can’t tell me that the wonderful priests and officials of the Roman Catholic Church, including the Pope, are immoral. They have a wall. Why can’t we?”

Listen:

While Booker had been specifically referencing the president’s wall when he spoke of “technologies [that allegedly] don’t work,” the fact remains he’s opposed every single move that Trump has made to try and resolve the ongoing border and immigration crisis.

When then-Attorney Jeff Sessions tried in 2017 to stop Democrat-led cities from becoming sanctuaries for illegals, he cried foul. When the president declared a national emergency earlier this year to obtain funding for the construction of a wall, he cried foul. And when Trump recently announced that he’s going to alleviate crowding in ICE’s detention facilities by releasing illegals in sanctuary cities, Booker again cried foul.

Speaking on CBS’s “Face the Nation,” he specifically said that releasing illegals in sanctuary cities such as his hometown of New Jersey would make said cities “less safe.”

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But if allowing detained illegals to take sanctuary in sanctuary cities would make said sanctuary cities “less safe,” then why are these cities sanctuary cities in the first place?

And if a border crisis exists along the border, as Booker admitted Tuesday, why did he join four other Democrat presidential candidates in voting against a spending bill in February that would have provided immigration authorities with the money needed to better handle the flood of illegals?

Even former Obama-era Department of Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson has repeatedly explained that immigration facilities are currently at their capacity and that the entire system has become “overwhelmed” and is in a state of “crisis.”

“When I was in office in [then-DHS Secretary] Kirstjen Nielsen’s job at her desk, I’d get to work around 6:30 in the morning and there’d be my intelligence book sitting on my desk, the PDB, and also the apprehension numbers from the day before,” said on MSNBC last month.

“And I’d look at them every memory morning, it would be the first thing I’d look at, and I probably got too close to the problem. And my staff will tell you, if it was under 1,000 apprehensions the day before, that was a relatively good number. And if it was above 1,000, it was a relatively bad number and I was going to be in a bad mood the whole day.”

He issued these remarks around the same time that DHS reported that over 4,000 illegal aliens had been apprehended crossing the border on in just one day.

Yet despite all this evidence of the need for action, and despite Booker’s admission Tuesday, he continues to block all efforts to actually solve the crisis. It’s almost as if he’s just saying what he thinks his constituents want to hear versus saying what’s really on his mind.

HERE’S WHAT YOU’RE MISSING …

Vivek Saxena

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

V. Saxena is a staff writer for BizPac Review with a decade of experience as a professional writer, and a lifetime of experience as an avid news junkie. He holds a degree in computer technology from Purdue University.
Vivek Saxena

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