Graham 2.0 working on immigration bill to ‘stop this madness’

While the Democratic Party is quick to react to every attempt by President Donald Trump to address our thoroughly broken immigration system, playing politics to say the president does not like “brown people” in the quest to pander to Hispanic voters, they offer nothing when it comes to tangible legislation to fix a problem they directly benefit from.

Republicans haven’t been much better since getting blasted — rightfully so — for the infamous “Gang of Eight” immigration reform bill that sank the career of Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., before it ever got afloat.

But Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., formerly known as “Sen. Grahamnesty” for his role in that bill, who is sometimes referred to today as Lindsey Graham 2.0, is tired of the immigration problem and, with more than 100,000 apprehensions in March alone and another caravan marching on our border, is working on legislation to “stop this madness.”

Appearing on Fox Business Network’s “Sunday Morning Futures,” Graham pointed to outdated amnesty laws, telling host Maria Bartiromo, “I want to fix it.”

 

The senator said he was working with the White House on legislation that he hopes will also be supported by Democrats.

“The president has correctly identified the crisis at the border. Now it’s time to have a legislative solution. You need to change our laws for this to stop,” Graham said.

“So I will be introducing a package, and, hopefully, with Democratic support, that will change our asylum law,” he said. “Ninety percent of the people who apply for asylum never make it, so the standard needs to change.

He also noted the Supreme Court case Reno v. Flores, that says you can only hold a minor illegal alien child 20 days.

“If a family comes here with a minor child, we release the entire family after 20 days, because we don’t have bed space,” Graham said. “So we need to change that decision.”

A third problem he looks to address deals with what Graham said was “a quirk in our law,” where minors from Central America cannot be sent back home because they’re from a noncontiguous countries.

“So the only place we can send a child back to is Mexico and Canada,” Graham said. “We need to be sending these kids back to Central America, where they come from.”

Graham said the U.S. is part of an international treaty that offers asylum to people “when they’re under threat of life and limb,” but the terms of that treaty say migrants are supposed to apply for asylum in the first safe country they reach, which for those trekking from Central America, would be Mexico.

Instead, they march on our southern border and, with a little coaching from the open border left, request asylum. Often after they are caught illegally entering the country.

“But if you get one foot in the United States, and you read a card claiming asylum, you’re entitled to a hearing,” Graham explained. “We don’t have bed space to hold you until that hearing date, so we release you into the country and people never come back for the hearing.

“So let’s toughen up our asylum standard,” he said.

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