Legislation could boot Dem-controlled corrupt Chicago out of Illinois to create whole new state

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A group of fed-up Republican legislators in Illinois are reportedly calling for the Democrat-controlled city of Chicago — where last month local Democrat prosecutors dropped all charges against hate crime hoax perpetrator Jussie Smollett despite an abundance of evidence — to be separated from the state and made into its own private little state or liberal “utopia,” if you will.

Granted, some legislators say they aren’t actually looking to separate Chicago.

“It’s more of a frustration of the policies than the true belief that Chicago and Illinois would be better off as separate states,” state Rep. C.D. Davidsmeyer claimed earlier this month to The State Journal-Register. I don’t believe that Chicago and the state of Illinois should be separated.”

“Our relationship is mutually beneficial,” he added before cautioning though that “[t]he policies that come down from Chicago are [what’re] actually pushing our economic opportunity away.”

Davidsmeyer is among seven state Republicans who’ve co-sponsored HR0101, the official bill that calls for the separation of Chicago from Illinois on the grounds that the political and ideological views of the city’s residents differ sharply with those of the state’s 10 million other residents.

“Numerous counties in the southern and central parts of Illinois are approving resolutions to become sanctuary counties for gun owners, while the City of Chicago has some of the strictest gun laws in the country,” the bill notes.

“The majority of residents in downstate Illinois disagree with City of Chicago residents on key issues such as  gun ownership, abortion, immigration, and other policy issues.”

The problem is that despite being a minority population-wise, Chicago’s citizens control the entire state’s agenda because of the voting power and economic influence they boast.

The bill notes for instance that Governor J. B. Pritzker, a Democrat, won the Illinois gubernatorial election last year despite losing most counties across the state:

“The divide between the City of Chicago and downstate Illinois is frequently manifested in electoral results such as the 2010 gubernatorial election in which the Democrat candidate won the election despite only carrying four counties out of 102 counties, and, in fact, did not need to carry any other counties to win because of the margin of victory in Chicago and Cook County.”

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“Our traditional family values seem to be under attack at every angle,” state Rep. Brad Halbrook, who introduced the bill in February, said to the Journal-Register. “We are trying to drive the discussion to get people at the table to say these are not our values down here.”

“When you have a large population center that seems to control the agenda for the rest of the state, it just kind of creates some issues. The Constitution gives us a pathway, so we’ll see what happens.”

The resentment between Chicago and the rest of the state involves more than just political differences. It also concerns the city’s longtime inability to manage its own finances.

“The City of Chicago is often bailed out by taxpayers in the rest of the State, such as the $221 million bailout for the CPS pension system that was signed into law 2 last year,” HR0101 notes.

Pensions in Chicago and other left-wing cities across the states have ballooned in recent years because of policies put in place by their respective left-wing legislators.

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The Windy City also has a notable problem with corruption.

“A report in February from the University of Illinois at Chicago found that Chicago was still the top in the ranking of the most corrupt big cities in the nation and Illinois the third most corrupt state in the nation,” Fox News notes.

And crime. Lots and lots of crime. Chicago has long been considered the murder capital of the U.S.

Davidsmeyer is still unsure how he actually feels about the bill.

“People say Chicago’s a huge economy, there’s no way you can survive without them, (but) I have people on the other side saying Chicago’s killing us with their policies, we need to separate,” he explained. “I’m one of the people in the middle saying let’s see both sides of it.”

Fair enough.

How does the public feel about the proposal?

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