Why are Republicans still investigating Russian collusion?

Sen. Richard Burr (R-NC), left, chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, with Mark Warner (D-Va), the ranking member of the committee. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

On his show on Wednesday night, Fox News host Tucker Carlson says he was shocked to learn that despite the FBI and Special Counsel Robert Mueller concluding the Russian investigation, the Republican-controlled Senate Intelligence Committee is continuing with its own investigation, and has just subpoenaed a former Trump campaign adviser — Sam Nunberg.

“It’s shocking, I think, to most of us who thought that the core of this story — the question of Russian collusion — was settled by the most elaborate investigation in my lifetime, that the Republican chairman of a Senate committee would be issuing a subpoena to you about your contacts with Roger Stone as if anyone could care, or would have reason to care,” Carlson said to Nunberg, who was appearing as a guest on his show.

Nunberg said he’d already met with the committee, turned over more than 60 documents and has fully cooperated with all of the committee’s requests, and doesn’t understand why he’s still under the microscope.

“We had our answer [on Russia collusion], just like you said, from Mueller,” he told Carlson.

 

Sen. Richard Burr, a Republican from North Carolina and the chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, has chosen to continue the committee’s investigation into alleged Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Burr told reporters at a press event at Duke University this week that he expects the investigation will be concluded and a report issued before members of Congress leave Washington, D.C. for the August recess.

Sam Nunberg says he was told by the ranking Democrat on the committee last year, Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.) that the investigation would be over by October of 2018.

Warner “had to rescind that because he got push-back from Democrats,” said Nunberg.

Carlson told his viewers that his staff had contacted Burr’s office to ask why they were continuing the investigation, but had not received a response.

“The Senate, really, what have they done to help Donald Trump?” asked Nunberg. “He’s getting victories on his own.

“How about the country?” said Carlson. “There’s a whole country, we’ve got 320 million people here waiting for help and they’re subpoenaing your conversations with Roger Stone.”

Nunberg says it seems that Burr and other Republicans on the committee are either under pressure from Democrats to continue the investigation, rather than stop it short, or have it in for Roger Stone, the legendary Republican political consultant who was a campaign adviser to Donald Trump until Aug. 8, 2015.

Stone has said publicly that he has cooperated with House and Senate Intelligence committee investigations, and with Mueller’s team, appearing in Washington and providing documents.

But in January, FBI agents raided his home in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., before dawn, and he was arrested on a seven-count indictment, none of the counts having to do with Russia or Russians or any interference in the 2016 election.

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