Youngest victim of 9/11 would be turning 20, but remaining 5 Al Qaeda suspects still not brought to trial

Screengrab Eunice Hanson

The youngest victim of the 9/11 terrorist attacks at the hands of Islamic extremists would be turning 20 later this month and her grandparents are still fighting for some sense of justice.

Not that most of the media is still interested.

Eunice and Lee Hanson, the grandparents of Christine Lee Hanson, who died in the attack, having been fighting for 18 years and there’s optimism that a trial date for the five Al Qaeda suspects still alive could be set soon, Fox News reported.

“I admire this prosecution team,” Eunice said after a recent 9/11 case update in New York City. “They’re working very hard. Very devoted.”

The Hanson family paid a dear price that fateful day — more from Fox News:

On 9/11, an entire generation of the Hanson family was killed. Eunice and Lee Hanson lost their granddaughter Christine, her father and their son Peter, as well as Peter’s wife, Sue Kim. They were heading to California to visit relatives and see Disneyland when their flight, United Airlines Flight 175, was hijacked and slammed into the World Trade Center. Christine’s beloved Peter Rabbit was subsequently donated to the 9/11 Memorial and Museum by her grandparents.

 

Lee Hanson, then 77-years-old, accurately predicted in 2011 that he would not live to see a trial of the Al Qaeda terrorists being held at Guantanamo Bay.

“We look pretty weak in that we can’t bring these people to trial,” he told Fox News at the time.

“How much damage do you have to do?” Hanson asked of 9/11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, who has spent more than a decade in a Gitmo prison cell. “How many people do you have to kill? And how many heads do you have to cut off before people say you’re gonna be brought to justice?”

Fox News noted that it was the only news outlet to have a camera crew on site when 9/11 families recently met with U.S. defense officials at a New York City hotel.

And Eunice Hanson attended alone.

“My husband just died in November,” she explained. “And he said all along that he’ll never live to see the end of this trial. And that’s just how I felt and it all came” to pass.

The suspects are facing a military tribunal, which has stalled, and some families are upset that the trial is not being held in a federal court, as then-Attorney General Eric Holder said in 2009 — he would reverse the decision after facing serious opposition, sending it back to Guantanamo.

“If we got them into federal court right here in New York, this whole thing would be over in six months.” Valerie Lucznikowska told Fox News through tears. “See, it’s still emotional for all of us. It’s still there. bring it to an end.”

At the center of the stalled military trial is that the Al Qaeda suspects were held in CIA secret prisons where they were subjected to enhanced interrogation tactics that critics claim is torture.

Tom Tillison

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