Covington kids’ attorney ramps up libel case against liberal smear merchants, starts naming names

 

(Video screenshot)

Nick Sandmann isn’t the only Covington Catholic High School student seeking to teach the media a lesson over the smears they published following the incident earlier this month at the Lincoln Memorial.

Speaking Saturday evening on Fox News’ “Watters World,” the attorney representing all the students, Robert Barnes, named a bevy of specific, mainly media, targets he’s intent on targeting with a libel suit.

Watch part one below:

 

“Maggie Haberman was one of the first people calling for the kids expulsion from ‘The New York Times,’ the reporter making false statements, calling for punitive action against these kids whom she’s never met, who are private citizens, based on an event that she didn’t even witness,” he said.

“But also others. Congresswoman Omar made false statements about these kids,” he added, referring to newly elected Muslim congresswoman Ilhan Omar. “We requested that she retract it or we’d sue her. An hour later she did retract it, to her credit. But others have not retracted.”

Including Haberman:

Nor has former CNN contributor Reza Aslan retracted a tweet he posted in which he said of Sandmann, “Honest question. Have you ever seen a more punchable face than this kid’s?”

Look:

“[Reza Aslan] is going to get sued next week,” Barnes said. “Similarly, Matthew Dowd. There’s been a request he retract. He’s an ABC commentator, pretends to be a Republican commentator. He’s made false statements about these kids, refused to retract it. … If he doesn’t retract, he’s going to get sued.”

“Michael Rapaport did a crude rap image against these kids,” he continued. “He’s refused to retract. He’s a famous Hollywood actor that’s on a Netflix show that’s about how we should avoid childhood bullying of kids. And here he is bullying kids.”

Watch Rapaport’s disturbing “rap image” below:

 

“The New York Daily News put a false headline out that various kids from the school had appeared in blackface. Totally false. They had been in a blackout, which is very common throughout the country … they’re going to get sued,” the attorney continued.

Barnes list of targets is seemingly endless. The incomplete list below illustrates how far and wide the lies about what had happened spread:

“So everyone’s getting sued, it seems like,” Watters replied, before then asking Barnes whether it’s even possible to win these cases given the “high bar” that must be met.

According to Barnes, the answer is a resounding yes.

Listen:

HERE’S WHAT YOU’RE MISSING …

“In this case, there’s a unique exception: When there’s a defamation and libel of private citizens, particularly minors, the legal standard goes way down, so you no longer have to prove actual malice or malevolent intent,” he explained.

“All you have to prove is that a false statement was made or — in Kentucky the law’s even broader — an unflattering impression given that put a person’s reputation in a false light. And otherwise that it be negligent for them to do so.”

“That’s why the whole family gave everybody 48 hours to correct all of these statements. If they still refused to do so, it’s clearly negligent for them to keep false statements up.”

And so when the media figures named above get sued, they’ll only have themselves to blame. The hope by some social media users is that these suits will perhaps inspire the media to start acting with a shred more accountability and integrity.

Look:

The latter Twitter user had a point. As noted by others on social media, there are numerous other media outlets and entities that posted smears about the Covington boys:

HERE’S WHAT YOU’RE MISSING …

Vivek Saxena

Comments

Latest Articles