Migrant child who died tested positive for flu. With illness on the rise, what does it mean for America’s children?

An autopsy has revealed that the young migrant boy who died in U.S. custody had been suffering from the flu.

While the cause of death for 8-year-old Felipe Gómez Alonzo is still under investigation, the New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator did report that the Guatemalan child tested positive for influenza B.

 

“Results of nasal and lung swabs have tested positive for influenza B,” the office said, according to NBC News. “While this result indicates that the child had influenza, determining an accurate cause of death requires further evaluation of other laboratory specimens and interpreting the findings in the context of the symptoms and autopsy findings.”

The young boy, who was apprehended at the border Dec. 18 with his father, was taken to a New Mexico hospital on Monday for flu symptoms. He was treated and released with medications, returning to a U.S. holding facility with his father. Later that night, after vomiting and a return of symptoms, the child was transported back to the hospital where he died.

He is the second migrant child to die in U.S. custody this month after a 7-year-old Guatemalan girl died on Dec. 8.

The boy’s father reportedly “declined medical assistance” at some point and reports revealed that the young girl who died earlier in the month had suffered from malnutrition on the perilous journey her family forced her to undertake.

Many of the migrants crossing the border are reportedly sick with fevers like Alonzo’s as well as other potentially contagious medical conditions. The child’s death has prompted an investigation by the Department of Homeland Security into migrant facilities in Mexico and the U.S. to determine what conditions are contributing to illness and disease.

According to a DHS official, “literally dozens” of sick migrants are daily taken across the border to hospitals and CBP decided Tuesday that medical checks will be conducted on every child who comes through its facilities.

And as they cross into the U.S., many are reportedly bringing these illnesses with them. A Tijuana Health Department report last month revealed many of the migrants who came to the Mexican city with the caravan are suffering from serious medical issues like tuberculosis and chickenpox and more than one-third of the 6,000 migrants now living there were being treated for respiratory infections and other health-related issues.

With an increasing flow of illegal immigrants attempting and succeeding in crossing into the U.S., there comes a need to address the potential medical emergency they could precipitate.

BPR recently reported on the “mysterious” disease that’s spreading through the U.S. as the immigration crisis continues:

A polio-like illness caused by a virus has been on the rise, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) which has launched a task force to learn more, according to American Thinker, which reported: “The disease sleuths at the CDC are befuddled.”

The publication noted that scientists are “stumped” by Acute flaccid myelitis, or perhaps “for political reasons” don’t want to reveal too much.

“Perhaps the scientists have some ideas where AFM came from and why it is increasing in prevalence, but if they want to keep their jobs, pensions, and reputations, they feign ignorance,” Denver based physician Brian C. Joondeph wrote.

Meanwhile, the State Department of Public Health in Connecticut told parents they have until Dec. 31 to get their pre-K children vaccinated against the flu or risk not being allowed to send them to school in the fall.

The Connecticut law requires children between the ages of 2 and 4 years old have to receive their annual flu shot by the end of December, according to WTNH-TV.

However, the state does offer a religious exemption and possibly other exemptions as well.

Many slammed the flu shot mandate on Twitter but, with the increasing amount of illnesses and diseases being treated across the nation, one wonders how many other states will soon follow Connecticut’s lead.

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