William Shatner’s hot over ‘Baby It’s Cold Outside’ lyrics, battles it out with fans

When radio stations began banning the classic Christmas song “Baby It’s Cold Outside” because of complaints by social justice warriors, they never considered the consequences.

One of those consequences was a war that was launched by legendary Hollywood actor William Shatner — who played Capt. James T. Kirk in the TV series “Star Trek” — against one of those very same radio stations that had bowed to the politically correct mob.

“Call in to CBC radio all day and get them to play “Baby It’s Cold Outside” over and over until midnight!” the anti-PC warrior (or captain, if you will) tweeted Tuesday in response to a report that CBC Radio was slated to ban the classic song at the end of the day.

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But while this willingness to stand up to the mob earned him accolades from some, it also triggered another war: One between the legendary actor and his Twitter followers.

“Congrats Bill, never let sex assault victims get in the way of your fun,” one particularly exasperated follower named “Wiggin” wrote in a sarcastic tweet.

The lyrics of the song tell the story of a man trying to convince a woman to stay with him at his house during a cold evening instead of returning to her own home.

Though the woman repeatedly says “no,” the man playfully persists by pouring her drinks and arguing, “Baby, it’s cold outside. … Think of my lifelong sorrow! … If you caught pneumonia and died!”

By the end of the song, the woman agrees to stay, singing, “Okay fine, just another drink then.” And according to social justice warriors like “Wiggin,” this amounts to date rape.

Check out Shatner’s replies to this and other criticism below:

Despite complaints from social justice warriors, the captain ultimately won.

“Last week, we decided to press pause to consider the different points of view on playing ‘Baby, It’s Cold Outside.’ Because we value our audience input, which was overwhelmingly to include the song, we have put it back on the two playlists where it had been removed,” CBC Radio announced Tuesday.

It’s unclear whether the announcement was issued before or after Shatner’s tweet. What is known is that CBC Radio is one of numerous stations that initially banned the classic song but later reversed their bans after outcry from a public fed up with political correctness.

The idea of banning the 74-year-old song first emerged earlier this month after a Cleveland statement removed it because a listener complained that the song is inappropriate.

“It wasn’t really our decision. It’s the decision of our listeners,” WDOK midday host Desiray Cross claimed, though she then proceeded to make it clear she herself finds the song offensive.

“People might say, ‘oh, enough with that #MeToo,’ but if you really put that aside and listen to the lyrics, it’s not something I would want my daughter to be in that kind of a situation,” she complained to news station WJW. “The tune might be catchy, but let’s maybe not promote that sort of an idea.”

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While a small but loud minority agreed with this decision — as well as the decision by other stations to follow WDOK’s lead — an even louder majority soon made it clear they didn’t.

Shatner is clearly among the louder majority, though it turns out that many members of the loud minority were his Twitter followers, including “Wiggin.”

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What remains unclear is why the same activists crying foul over this song never complain about the genuinely filthy and demeaning lyrics heard in contemporary rap music.

No matter, because according to a much larger majority — the one responsible for the song’s gradual return to the airwaves — all this hoopla is much ado about nothing.

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As for Shatner, he’s not quite done with his war just yet:

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