DOJ releases staggering stats on amount of illegal immigrants who skip hearings and ‘disappear’

New Justice Department statistics reveal that half of the young illegal immigrants who are caught crossing the border do not follow through by appearing in deportation courts.

About 25,000 mostly young, single Latin American males end up hiding out in the US for the rest of their lives as they refuse to comply with orders to appear in court, according to a disturbing analysis of the Department of Justice statistics conducted by the Center for Immigration Studies, the Washington Examiner reported.

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Nearly 60,000 “unaccompanied alien children” are projected to cross the border in 2018 with most of given temporary entry with directions to appear at immigration court.

According to the report by former immigration official Andrew Arthur:

The number of UACs who were ordered removed in absentia, that is, after failing to appear for immigration court, has skyrocketed from 450 in FY 2010 to 6,662 in FY 2018, an almost 1,500 percent increase during a period of time when the number of UACs apprehended increased about 272 percent (from 18,411 in FY 2010 to 50,036 in FY 2018). In fact, in FY 2018, half of all case completions involving UACs were in absentia orders, according to [Justice’s Executive Office for Immigration Review] compared to an overall in absentia average of 25 percent of all case completions.

 

An unbelievable number of these illegal immigrants are released instead of being held.

“Thus far in FY18, 13,186 UACs were released into the interior of the United States — that’s in addition to the 42,146 UACs and 52,147 UACs who were released in FY17 and FY16 respectively, bringing the total number of UACs released from FY16 to date in excess of 107,000,” a Homeland Security Department report, which was referred to by Arthur, read.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement is faced with the daunting and expensive prospect of finding the illegal immigrants , many of whom are sheltered by organizations and in sanctuary cities, the Washington Examiner reported.

“The huge percentage of UACs in absentia orders suggests that those individuals simply entered the United States to remain in this country illegally, and are not seeking protection from some danger that would entitle them to humanitarian relief, or to some other immigration benefit,” Arthur wrote.

There are an estimated  2,300 “unaccompanied alien children” in the Central American migrant caravan headed to the US border, according to a UNICEF report.

“Any court system in which half of the parties required to appear fail to do so is in crisis,” Arthur wrote, adding “Respectfully, Congress and the courts created this mess.”

Arthur concluded the analysis with a scathing commentary on the staggering statistics.

“The reasons that those parents are subjecting their children to such hardships and abuse is as clear as the facts set forth above: Bring a child to the United States, and the child will likely be released, as will you. If I were to attempt such a journey with my son, however, I doubtless would be arrested by the authorities and charged with child abuse and child endangerment,” he said.

“I am personally acquainted with many of the people who have made these decisions, and I have no doubt that they had only the best interests of both the UACs and the nation at heart,” Arthur added. “As the facts above, and the EOIR statistics reveal, however, those decisions are having deleterious consequences, both for the children involved and for our system of justice as a whole.”

Frieda Powers

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