Ebony mag salutes the 18 black women running for Congress, leaves off the 6 Conservative ones

According to the popular African American magazine Ebony, the six black Republican women running for Congress apparently aren’t black enough to qualify for what was supposed to be a “definitive” list of all black women running for office this election season.

“Meet the 18 Black Women Running for a Seat in Congress,” the title of the list published earlier this month by magazine Ebony reads.

“This midterm election is one to watch with all 435 seats in the U.S. House up for grabs. Meet the 18 Black women vying for a congressional seat,” the piece begins, before listing 18 black political candidates, all of whom happen to be Democrats.

According to The Daily Caller, the list neglected to mention California Republican candidate Aja Smith, Florida Republican candidate Virginia Fuller, Maryland Republican candidate Liz Matory, New York Republican candidate Jineea Butler and Utah Republican incumbent Rep. Mia Love , and Charlotte Bergmann running for Tennessee’s 9th Congressional District.

Why were they excluded? Many suspect it’s because of the disturbing belief among some that blacks who associate with the Republican Party are “coons” and “Uncle Toms.” It’s a sentiment former House Republican Conference chair J.C. Watts of Oklahoma knows plenty about.

“It doesn’t matter whether it is Colin Powell or Condoleezza Rice, Shelby Steele, Thomas Sowell, Clarence Thomas, or yours truly — we have all been labeled expedients, Uncle Toms, oreos, sell-outs, traitors to our race, and other equally uncomplimentary characterizations,” he wrote in his 2002 book, “What Color Is A Conservative?”

“Most of all, however, critics of black conservatives say we’ve forgotten where we came from. I may forget a federal budget number or, God forbid, to set the alarm clock for my weekly 6 a.m. flight to Washington, but I know exactly where I came from. I know because every decision I make every day is based on the values and lessons I learned growing up on the poor side of the tracks in a dusty little Oklahoma town that most people have never heard of and nobody can spell right the first time.”

While this frustration with being disrespected for being a conservative minority has been breeding for decades, only now has it begun to be exposed to light, thanks in part to efforts by firebrand conservative activists such as Candace Owens.

Though she herself isn’t a politician, Owens has made a name for herself as a proud black conservative and supporter of President Donald Trump — one who refuses to be disrespected and silenced with derogatory terms like “Uncle Tom” and coon”:

It’s perhaps because of the likes of Owen — more of whom emerge every single day — that Ebony appears to be facing an unprecedented amount of backlash for its discriminatory post.

Look:

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