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‘Just here to hold the sign’?! Charlie Kirk has eye-opening confrontation with anti-Kavanaugh protesters

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An organizer for protests against US Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh was schooled on the First Amendment when she tried to stop Charlie Kirk from asking questions.

The Turning Point USA founder took to the street to ask demonstrators outside Kavanaugh’s Senate confirmation hearings why they were protesting.

Most of the “astroturf crowd” he encountered, however, could not clearly say what they thought was so dangerous about Presidnet Trump’s Supreme Court pick, as Kirk explained on “Fox & Friends” Thursday.

“American rights are at stake if this guy gets put on,” one man told Kirk, while another person simply said, “I’m just here to hold the sign.”

“I was there for a couple hours and had very interesting encounters with far left activists, many of whom were disrupting the actual hearings. They wore that as a badge of honor,” Kirk told hosts Steve Doocy and Ainsley Earhardt.

“But there was no cohesive message,” he added, saying most of their “talking points” came from the signs they were given to hold.

In fact, some witnesses who came to watch the hearings reportedly saw protesters being paid in cash to disrupt the hearing.

Kirk shared how a protest organizer approached him at one point saying he was “not allowed to come and talk to our people.”

“I’m kicking you out because you are here putting people on camera, having conversations,” the woman said, before notifying a Capitol police officer.

Except the officer knew Kirk had every right to be there and he couldn’t remove him from the public area outside the U.S. Capitol.

“Your right to free speech doesn’t trump his,” he told the woman.

“They’re worried about rights being taken away and the only thing they could think about was trying to take my right to free speech away because I was disagreeing with them,” Kirk said, adding that he told the organizers who claimed they had a permit to be there, that “a permit is permission, it’s not a permission to discriminate.”

“Just asking questions from a very journalistic point of view triggered them so much,” said Kirk, arguing that the “nonsense” happening on college campuses is now spreading to higher levels.

Frieda Powers

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