‘They pushed me’: Papa John’s founder speaks out. What nobody is telling you about his use of N-word.

In an interview Friday regarding allegedly racist remarks he had made during an inter-company conference call with a marketing agency earlier in the week, Papa Johns founder John Schnatter managed to stir the hornet’s nest again.

During the conference call Wednesday, the marketing agency had been coaching him on how to speak on sensitive topics such as race. The training had been prompted by scathing remarks he had made last year about the NFL’s national anthem protests. Though a majority of Americans also disagree with the protests, Schnatter was labeled a racist by the far-left for his honesty.

Schnatter’s penchant for honesty bit him in the butt again Wednesday when he dared to point out to the marketing agency that it was patently unreasonable to label him a racist.

What specifically occurred was that the marketing group asked him how he intends to distance himself from racist groups like the Ku Klux Klan. He responded by noting that even though “Colonel Sanders called blacks n*****s,” he never faced the same grade of backlash. Colonel Sanders was the founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken.

His point was that the whole situation is ridiculous. All he had done was express his opposition to the NFL’s disrespectful protests. But because of how Schnatter conveyed this point — via the use of the n-word, which was admittedly dumb — his world has quickly come crashing down around him.

First the media began portraying him as a white supremacist who hates blacks. Then dozens of sports chains cut their tie with Papa Johns. And last but not least Schnatter was effectively forced by public pressure to step down as the chairman of the very found he once founded.

Now fast forward to Friday, when Schnatter sat down for an interview with Louisville, Kentucky news station WHAS. While it remains unknown what his intent had been with the interview, it’s clear now it’s only exacerbated the crisis in his life.

The problem is that he kept jumping between apologizing for his alleged crime against humanity to pinning the blame on other parties.

“The agency was promoting that vocabulary. .. They pushed me. And it upset me,” seemingly blame his choice of words on the marketing agency.

That attempt to deflect criticism was not appreciated by the leftist mobs on social media:

“It’s caused a lot of grief for my community, for my university. … My employees are distraught, they’re crushed, and it’s all because I was sloppy and I wasn’t as sensitive. It’s the same mistake I made on the NFL comments,” Schnatter added during his interview.

Except that his remarks about the NFL weren’t a mistake — they were him being honest. And while his decision to use the n-word was definitely a mistake (a big one), it doesn’t signify that he’s a racist and white supremacist. Not by a long shot, considering the context.

Moreover, this rush by the radical far-left to paint anyone who says anything controversial as a veritable Nazi is far more harmful to America’s long-term health and well-being than his error. Consider that this whole fiasco began with Schnatter merely criticizing the predominantly black NFL. Where does it stop, and how close is America to the point when just criticizing a black man or woman will be deemed an act of vile racism?

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Vivek Saxena

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