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Starbucks’ horrible treatment of manager in Philly could make her a multi-millionaire when she’s done

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With Starbucks in such a rush to appease the racial grievance crowd, the company essentially threw a manager trying to enforce what she understood to be standard policy under the bus.

But could this rush to judgement prove to be a windfall for Holly Hylton, the woman identified as the manager?

In statements issued and tweeted, Starbucks was clear that the manager’s decision to tell two black non-paying customers to make a purchase or leave — no one would have batted an eye had the men been white — was racially motivated.

Gregg Re, an attorney who writes for The Daily Caller, said in an op-ed run Saturday, “DEFAMATION: The Starbucks Manager Accused Of Racism Is Probably About To Be A MILLIONAIRE,” that “a reasonable person would conclude that Starbucks is calling Hylton, at best, an unwitting racist.”

“Starbucks and its CEO Kevin Johnson have gone out of their way to imply that the female manager, identified in media reports as Holly Hylton, was acting on subconscious racial motivations when she told the loitering customers to either buy a beverage or get out of her store,” Re wrote.

Pointing to the defamation laws in Pennsylvania, where the incident took place, Re noted that the burden is on the plaintiff to show that the statement made about the defendant, was false, and caused damages.

The attorney explains how Hylton can accomplish this:

Hylton can also likely meet her burden of showing that Starbucks’ claim that she violated store policy is false. In fact, the same company spokesperson who said the police should never have been called also said that the standard policy is to call the police when non-purchasers refuse to leave the store.

“In this particular store, the guidelines were that partners must ask unpaying customers to leave the store, and police were to be called if they refused,” a Starbucks spokeswoman told The Washington Post last week. It seems that following the guidelines is exactly what the manager did.

 

He goes on to explain that if Starbucks says the manager broke policy, “it’s effectively denying (through omission) that the customers were trespassing at all.”

“Those are implied factual assertions, and they can form the basis of a defamation suit,” Re concluded.

There are other circumstances at play here, Re noted, such as unverified claims that Hylton has exhibited racist behavior before. The Daily Wire countered with a report that a patron called her a “SJW feminist of the highest order.”

In the end, Re pointed to a recent incident where a black man successfully walked into a Starbucks and demanded a free coffee as reparations to say the “humiliated” manager could take the company to court “for her own ‘Starbucks reparations.'”

According to the reaction on social media, there’s a fair number of folks hoping she does just that.

Here’s a sampling of reactions from Twitter:

Tom Tillison

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