Newt: California may strangely be on the brink of electing of Republican governor

Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich believes the time is ripe for the “infamously liberal” state of California to see a Republican governor.

“According to the Public Policy Institute of California, Cox (who I greatly respect and have worked with for years) has been gaining support since January and is now the second-place pick for governor among likely California primary voters,” Gingrich wrote in an opinion piece for Fox News.  “This puts him right behind the leading Democrat and represents a great potential for Cox to win the governorship seven months from now.”

(Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

California’s primary system will require all gubernatorial candidates to appear on a single ballot in the June 5 primary, with the two receiving the most votes advancing to the November 6 election which will replace termed-out Gov. Jerry Brown.

Only 14 of California’s 53 House seats are held by Republicans, Gingrich noted, with all on the ballot this November which creates an urgency for Republicans.

While the top Democrat contender holds a lead over Cox, the 62-year-old Chicago native earned 14 percent support against the five other primary candidates according to the Public Policy Institute of California survey cited by Gingrich.

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“If California Republicans do not turn out in force in June and November, the Republican majority and President Trump’s agenda could be in trouble,” Gingrich wrote, noting a SmithJohnson Research survey which showed that 99.6 percent of California Republicans said they planned to vote in the June primary.

According to Gingrich:

 

Clearly, Californians would benefit from Cox’s conservative leadership. The state is ranked worst for individual income taxes and 48th overall by the Tax Foundation’s 2018 State Business Tax Climate Index.

Cox would work to cut state taxes so that Californians would see more take-home pay and small businesses would be more able to grow, succeed, expand and create more jobs. This includes the hugely unpopular gasoline tax that the Democratic California Legislature and Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown imposed on drivers last year.

 

While only 12 percent of the national population calls California home, one in three welfare recipients in the nation live in the Golden State where liberal leadership has led to an expensive dependency on government programs, Gingrich explained.

“Establishing a system that promotes work and capability over welfare and dependency would do wonders to bring struggling Californians out of poverty,” he wrote. “Following these pro-work models, Cox could do wonders for replacing poverty with prosperity in California. You can bet the Democratic candidates will simply double-down on the government spending model and make the problem worse.”

Cox has also vowed to work with federal immigration officials and has pledged to end the state’s sanctuary policies.

“As governor, Cox would put the safety and interests of Californians over those of criminal non-citizens,” Gingrich wrote.

The 74-year-old Republican, who served in the House until 1999, called on the GOP to “engage and build momentum in every election, at every level” to keep and grow the majority.

“There’s no doubt: California will be a difficult battleground. Our opponents are entrenched and well-funded,” he concluded. “However, if we can win there, it will show the nation that we can win everywhere.”

 

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