Right on cue, Susan Rice appears in the US media to bash Trump’s ‘historic’ North Korea meeting

Susan Rice is determined to be in the news, and her appearance on MSNBC to bash President Trump’s announced meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un couldn’t come at a more interesting time.

The former National Security Adviser discussed the president’s planned visit with Andrea Mitchell of MSNBC.

“Back to the Korea story, which some have suggested, Susan Rice is now with us, the former national security adviser and of course, United Nations ambassador,” Mitchell said.

“There’s been a lot of talk the president is trying to deflect from bad publicity about Stormy Daniels with this audible, but it seems likely as well that this is just Donald Trump being improvisational and impromptu when he had the South Korean foreign minister in the White House and said ‘let me talk to him,” Mitchell continued.

“All of a sudden, he’s announcing a summit without frankly a lot of prior notice to the Secretary of State traveling in Africa. Do you think it’s a good thing no matter how it evolved, Dr. Rice?” Mitchell asked.

“Well, I am not of the view that a summit in itself is a bad thing,” Rice said. “I think it matters entirely how we do it and as you pointed out a number of times already in the broadcast, summits, in order for them to succeed, have to be well prepared.”

“This one was hastily agreed and it’s questionable whether it can be well prepared in the time frame that we have,” Rice added. “We also have the challenge of the fact that we have a president who hasn’t conducted a successful negotiation domestically or internationally, who doesn’t seem to like to prepare or be detail-oriented, and who has a quite hollowed-out stable of experts now both at the State Department and elsewhere in the administration.”

“So there’s a real risk, I’m afraid, that if we dash into this without proper preparation, the president himself tries to conduct a substantive negotiation without the benefit of experts, that we could fail and in the context of failure, I think the risk of conflict increases,” she said.

“But diplomacy in my judgment in most instances is better, certainly in this case, than the status quo where North Korea has been able to pursue its nuclear and missile ambitions unchecked, and it’s certainly better than a preemptive or bloody nose strike of the sort that I think some in the administration have been contemplating, unfortunately, and so now the question is how do we make this work. And I think there are a number of steps we could take if we were careful and thoughtful about this that could increase the chances that yield something beneficial,” Rice said.

It’s worth pointing out that Rice threw herself and the Obama administration into question by stating North Korea has been “able to pursue its nuclear and missile ambitions unchecked.” She thus left the United States and the world a mess to clean up, while she plays armchair critic on network television.

Additionally, while the Democratic Party and ex-Obama administration officials dive headfirst into the deep end of Russian election meddling theories, it came out in a report today via Michael Isikoff and David Corn that it was Rice herself who issued a “stand down order” not to pursue more aggressive cybersecurity measures against the Russians.

That “stand down” order came amidst attempted hacks of the DNC and the Hillary Clinton campaign. The DNC also didn’t allow the FBI to investigate the server hardware after the hacking attack.

(Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

It all adds up to a lot of questions at a time when Ms. Rice perhaps shouldn’t be drawing so much attention to herself.

Kyle Becker

Kyle Becker

Chief Editor at BizPacReview
Before becoming Chief Editor at BizPac Review, Kyle was the Sr. Managing Editor and Director of Viral Media at Top 25 News & Politics website IJReview. With distinctive headlines and unique storytelling, he amassed hundreds of millions of story pageviews and led a team that generated billions of pageviews. Kyle also speaks fluent Russian and worked as an editor in Moscow before getting his Master's degree in International Studies.
Kyle Becker

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