President Trump just dissolved voter fraud commission after states refuse to turn over election data

The Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, established last May to investigate allegations of widespread voter fraud in the 2016 election, was dissolved on Wednesday by President Trump, and his reasoning has nothing to do with actual voter fraud not existing.

According to The Hill, several states refused to turn over voter information to the commission, thus making its job virtually impossible to do.

In a statement, White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said, “rather than engage in endless legal battles at taxpayer expense,” the president abolished the commission via executive order. Instead, the issue will be turned over to the Department of Homeland Security.

The panel, led by Vice President Mike Pence and Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, only reportedly met two times, but it didn’t take long for several states, which obviously had nothing whatsoever to hide, to refuse to comply.

Kris Kobach, a strong proponent of voter ID laws (screengrab)

“I have no intention of honoring this request. Virginia conducts fair, honest, and democratic elections, and there is no evidence of significant voter fraud in Virginia,” said the totally non-sleazy Governor of Virginia, Terry McAuliffe, in a statement last July, only one month before a former Virginia college student was sentenced to 100 days in jail for registering dead people as Democratic voters.

Democrats and civil-rights groups have fought the panel from its inception, and were giddy at Wednesday’s move.

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“The claim of widespread voter fraud in the United States is in fact, fraud. The demise of this commission should put this issue to rest,” said Michael Waldman, president of the liberal Brennan Center for Justice, according to The Hill.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer reportedly called the panel a “front to suppress the vote, perpetrate dangerous and baseless claims” that “was ridiculed from one end of the country to the other.”

Yep, nothing to hide at all.

Last July, the New York Post’s Deroy Murdock penned an article entitled, “The Vote Fraud That Democrats Refuse to See.” In it, he cited several instances of real voter fraud, including:

In May 2016, CBS2 Los Angeles identified 265 dead voters in southern California. Many cast ballots “year after year.”

The Heritage Foundation’s non-exhaustive survey confirms, since 2000, at least 742 criminal vote-fraud convictions.

North Carolina announced in April 2014 that 13,416 dead voters were registered, and 81 of them recently had voted. Among 35,750 North Carolinians also registered in other states, 765 voted in November 2012, both inside and outside the Tarheel State.

South Carolina’s attorney general concluded in January 2012 that 953 people “were deceased at the time of their participation in recent elections.”

The Public Interest Legal Foundation recently discovered that Virginia removed 5,556 non-citizens from its voter rolls between 2011 and last May. Among these non-Americans, 1,852 had cast a total of 7,474 illegal ballots across multiple elections.

Meanwhile, Judicial Watch has just sued two states to clean up their voter rolls. With President Trump at least temporarily out of this particular fight, we need all the help we can get!

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Scott Morefield

Scott Morefield

Scott Morefield is a news and opinion columnist for BizPac Review. In addition to his work on BPR, Scott's commentary can also be found on Townhall, TheBlaze, The Hill, WND, Breitbart, National Review, The Federalist, and many other sites, including A Morefield Life, where he and his wife, Kim, share their marriage and parenting journey.
Scott Morefield

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