Reporters unveil vicious attacks on ‘bully’ Sarah Sanders – and yes, some of it’s personal

True to form, the national liberal media has been finding increasingly personal and hateful ways of late to criticize their primary Trump administration source – White House press secretary Sarah Sanders.

A Thanksgiving Washington Examiner report details how “several high-profile columnists and writers have torn into Sanders over the last few weeks to mock her appearance, the way she talks, and most recently, an alleged disdain she showed the press by asking them at a briefing this week to say why they are thankful this holiday season.”

(AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The Washington Post’s Kathleen Parker called Sanders “everything a terrible person… could hope for in a public relations artist.”

“Sanders’s sudden shift from press secretary to minister’s daughter a few days before Thanksgiving coincides with her apparent image evolution from a woman unconcerned with vanity to a more polished version,” Parker wrote on Tuesday. “One can almost hear the hive of consultants discussing how to imperceptibly adapt this no-frills yeoman to the shallower requirements of a visual medium.”

Many in the media took offence to Sanders’ Monday request that press members say something they are thankful for before beginning their question, arguably one of the more light-hearted exchanges between Sanders and the press.

Masha Gessen of the New Yorker considered Sanders’ request “degrading” and even called the press secretary a “bully” who mocked “democratic institutions, and the English language.”

CNN national security analyst John Kirby called the “little stunt” by Sanders “cringe-worthy,” writing that it “made me embarrassed for the reporters and angry at Sanders and this White House for their arrogance and condescension.”

Not everyone felt the same. One reporter told the Examiner off the record, “Clearly, if you pay attention to what happened in the room, everyone participated. I just don’t see what’s so bad.”

Some of the criticism isn’t merely consigned to her actions at the podium.

“[S]he’s serving a function other than communication, which turns out not to be her forte,” New York Times columnist Frank Bruni wrote. “To listen to her pronounce ‘priorities’ is akin to hearing the air seep out of a flat tire, and she leaves half of the consonants on the curb.”

Los Angeles Times columnist David Horsey called Sanders “a slightly chunky soccer mom” who “does not look like the kind of woman Donald Trump would choose as his chief spokesperson,” a criticism for which he later apologized.

Then, there was this offensive cartoon calling Sanders “Big Mother” …

White House Communications Director Hope Kicks called Sanders a “wonderful role model and representative” for the country.

“I saw this first hand on our recent trip to Asia where Sarah was sought out by so many people in every country we visited,”Hicks told the Examiner. “Countless strangers praised her strength and grace under pressure. I have seen first hand how everywhere we go Sarah seeks out our bravest men and women to thank them for their service and sacrifice, and yet she is always amazed when they say the same back to her. Those are the kind of personal comments that truly matter.”

However, one political reporter told the Examiner they actually prefer Sanders over her former boss, Sean Spicer.

“For me, she’s more responsive than Sean Spicer ever was,” the reporter said. “I think she tries to be helpful, but with this White House you always have to be concerned with how much she even knows. And I usually find you have to go deeper into the administration and on background to uncover the real story.”

Another reporter summed up the criticism quite well by saying, “A lot of [the criticism] is just that she doesn’t feed our egos.”

Bingo.

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Op-ed views and opinions expressed are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of BizPac Review.

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Scott Morefield

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