Evergreen professor chased off campus gets big bucks from ‘all white day’ scandal lawsuit, but is it enough?

The college professor who refused to leave campus under pressure from students, who wanted all white people off of school grounds for the 2017 “Day of Absence,” has settled his $3.85 million lawsuit with the university.

Evergreen State College settled for $500,000 with the professor, Bret Weinstein, and his wife Heather Heying who accused the school of failing to “protect its employees from repeated provocative and corrosive verbal and written hostility based on race, as well as threats of physical violence,” The Olympian reported.

The lawsuit said that Evergreen “sent the unmistakable message that the school will tolerate (and even endorse) egregious violations (and even crimes) purportedly to advance racial social goals, diminishing the collegiate experience for all, and fostering a racially hostile work and retaliatory environment for faculty and staff.”

“Through a series of decisions made at the highest levels, including to officially support a day of racial segregation, the college has refused to protect its employees from repeated provocative and corrosive verbal and written hostility based on race, as well as threats of physical violence,” it said.

Weinstein said that, in addition for students calling for him to be fired, he was subjected to being labeled as racist by school faculty.

Weinstein was critical of the Day of Absence change in that diverged from previous years in which black students left campus to discuss race issues.

Image: Screenshot

The professor lashed out at the idea of asking white students and faculty to leave, and called it “an act of oppression,” in emails to one of the event organizers, Rashida Love.

Angry students surrounded and confronted the professor, literally chasing him off campus.

Weinstein, a liberal, appeared on Fox News where he told Tucker Carlson that he was afraid of what these student’s attitudes meant for the future of the left in America.

On Friday, the school sent out an email where it announced the settlement, but stressed that it was not an admission of guilt.

“In making this agreement, the college admits no liability, and rejects the allegations made in the tort claim. The educational activities of Day of Absence/Day of Presence were not discriminatory. The college took reasonable and appropriate steps to engage with protesters during spring quarter, de-escalate conflict, and keep the campus safe,” Chief of Staff John Carmichael wrote in the email.

Spokesman Zach Powers, a spokesman for the school, told The Olympian that the settlement was in the best interests of the school.

“Years of expensive litigation would drain resources and distract from our mission to provide an outstanding education at reasonable cost to the veterans, first-generation college students, creative thinkers and future leaders who study at Evergreen,” he said.

Weinstein and his wife have both resigned from their positions with the college following the incident.

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Carmine Sabia

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