Brutal footage, reports from vengeful Iraqi army shows no mercy for captured ISIS suspects

*Warning for graphic content. 

Footage of alleged ISIS fighters being held in brutal conditions is sweeping the internet.

Hundreds of prisoners are being held in cramped, and unbearably hot conditions in the now liberated city of Mosul in Iraq.

Reporters for the Associated Press photographed and documented at least 100 fighters huddled onto the floor in temperatures in excess of 110 degrees, amid charges of human rights violations.

Hundreds of suspected Islamic State members swept up by Iraqi forces in Mosul are being held in a cramped and stifling prison just outside the city. (AP Photo/Bram Janssen)

Four Iraqi officers admitted brutal practices to the AP, but asked for anonymity even though they feel justified in their treatment of the prisoners.

“Prisoners are infected with diseases, lots of health and skin problems, because they’re not exposed to the sun,” an officer said of the facility that currently holds more than 370 suspected jihadists.

“The majority can’t walk. Their legs are swollen because they can’t move,” he added.

One Iraqi lieutenant has been hunting for two ISIS members that he believes killed his family.

In this July 13, 2017 photo, Saddam Salih Ahmed, who was injured when his house was hit by an explosion, sits on his damaged street on the west side of Mosul, Iraq. Iraq’s U.S.-backed forces succeeded in wresting Mosul from the Islamic State group but at the cost of enormous destruction. The nearly 9-month fight culminated in a crescendo of devastation _ the blasting of the historic Old City to root out the militants’ final pockets. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

And during the search he has killed many detainees after interviewing them.

“I’m not selfish with my revenge, what I’m doing is for all Iraqis,” he told the AP.

(AP Photo/Bram Janssen)

He told a story of a call he got in July from an intelligence officer who told him that he was holding a suspected ISIS fighter.

“I didn’t torture him,” he said. “I cut the plastic handcuffs from his wrists and gave him water,’ the lieutenant said. The man was elderly, with a grey beard and hair.

“He begged me not to kill him as I questioned him,” the man said with a smile. “He could barely walk (he was so scared).”

But after the old man gave him the information he wanted, that’s precisely what he did.

“After I questioned him I sent him to hell,” he said, as he described shooting the old man with his side arm and leaving his body.

(AP Photo/Bram Janssen, File)

The lieutenant said that jihadists could bribe their way to freedom in the courts. It’s a risk he, and many Iraqi soldiers don’t want to take.

“I know some people believe that this kind of killing is wrong, but (ISIS), they are not human beings,” the man said. “I am the one who still has my humanity.”

The man said ISIS fighters kidnapped and killed his father, and one of the men bragged about it.

They also killed his uncle as well as other relatives and friends, he told reporters.

And when he finds the man he is still looking for, his plans are brutal.

“I hope I find him alive,” the man said, “because I want to make sure he dies a slow death, not quick. I want him to tell me where my father’s body is buried, and then I want to take his body and hang it from a post in my village.”

But some of the fighters in the prison said they preferred death as they proclaimed their innocence.

“You won’t find ten real (ISIS members) among these guys.

“And all of them have spent more than six months here. Since I got here eight months ago, I’ve only seen the sun once,” one man who claimed he was a civil servant, told the AP.

“We really want to die. None of us have received any visitors, relatives, family members. They don’t even know where we are,” another man said.

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Carmine Sabia

Carmine Sabia Jr started his own professional wrestling business at age 18 and went on to become a real estate investor. Currently he is a pundit who covers political news and current events.
Carmine Sabia

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