2,000 teachers show up to school in Black Lives Matter shirts, hand out propaganda swag to students

Around 2,000 teachers from Seattle, Washington, moved away from teaching and into race activism by wearing Black Lives Matter T-Shirts and sponsoring rallies to push the ideals of the domestic terror group.

Schools all across the Seattle city school district scheduled Black Lives Matter rallies as kids arrived at school on October 19, the Seattle Times reported.

Along with the T-Shirts, students were given lapel buttons and stickers to wear pushing the Black Lives Matter movement. Many made signs carrying racial slogans.

According to organizers, the purpose of these rallies were to affirm that “black lives matter in the public schools.”

Another reason the idea spread throughout the district is because the city’s John Muir school had to cancel a planned race rally last month over purported threats against teachers’ plans to wear Black Lives Matter shirts at school.

Black Student Union President Precious Manning, 17, insisted that the Black Lives Matter rallies means, “don’t leave us out.”

The rallies were not sponsored by the school district directly, but no move was made to limit them or put a halt to the district-wide plans to enlist the participation of each school in the city.

Teachers not only donned Black Lives Matter shirts, but some wore shirts featuring the slogan “#say­hername,” a reference to Sandra Bland, the young black woman who died in police custody in Texas a year ago.

Phyllis Campano, the president of the Seattle Education Association, tried to insist that the rallies had little to do with pushing the Black Lives Matter organization — a group that has been responsible for massive riots, property damage, destruction and even murders across the country — and more to do with pushing “education equality.”

“It’s not really about Black Lives Matter as a movement, but about how black lives matter in our schools,” Campano told ABC News, “it is not about the T-Shirts, it is about how we support our students of color in our community.”

“They don’t see themselves in curriculum or the histories, and we need more educators of color,” Campano concluded, “but in the meantime we need to make kids feel like they are truly included, and a part of the school.”

A spokesperson for the Seattle school district claimed district officials respect teachers’ rights to express themselves and said he hoped the message on the T-Shirts inspire people to do the work of “eliminating opportunity gaps.”

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