Donald Trump calls for profiling Muslims, cites perfect example

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Donald Trump continues to ignore political correctness in favor of good old-fashioned common sense.

In a telephone interview with John Dickerson on CBS’ “Face the Nation” on Sunday, Trump said the U.S. should consider profiling Muslims in response to terror attacks.

“I think profiling is something that we’re going to have to start thinking about as a country.” Trump said, “Other countries do it. You look at Israel and you look at others and they do it and they do it successfully. You know, I hate the concept of profiling, but we have to start using common sense and we have to use our heads.”

Trump has been more than consistent on this issue, having issued a similar call last December in response to the San Bernadino terrorist attack.

Democrats, predictably, have a different approach. In a Sunday speech criticizing Trump’s approach, Hillary Clinton said, “This approach isn’t just wrong. It is dangerous.”

Attorney General Loretta Lynch emphasized the importance of maintaining contacts in the Muslim community, telling CNN’s Dana Bash, “if they’re from that community and they’re being radicalized, their friends and family members will see it first. We investigate these cases aggressively, no stone is left unturned. There is no backing away from an issue, there is no backing away from an interview because of anyone’s background. Because for us, the source of information is very, very important.”

Common sense, of course, says that profiling works, and there is no better example than a country any ISIS terrorist worth his salt would love to take aim at – Israel. In a 2010 Haaretz op-ed, correspondent HaAnshel Pfeffer writes of the difficulties faced by Muslims who endure an entirely different set of airport screening than passengers of Jewish descent.

To Israelis, the practice of picking people out based on racial stereotypes is so self-evident, there isn’t even a Hebrew term for it …

In Israel though, there is no question whatsoever. It all happens quite openly. If you have a Hebrew name and ‘look Jewish,’ the security screening will be swift and painless. If your name is a bit less obviously Israeli, then there are some other key questions.

In my case, they ask how old I was when my family immigrated to Israel and where I served in the Israel Defense Forces, and after that it’s easy sailing. A friend with a similarly foreign name told me that with her, they just hear the Hebrew names of her children and she’s okay …

We all know why these questions are being asked and we all bear it with good humor. Let’s admit it, there is a general acceptance of the fact that non-Jewish, especially Muslim, passengers will get a working-over and have to arrive at the airport three hours earlier than the rest of us.

Of course, they could subject everyone to these inspections, but that would mean we couldn’t progress quickly and smoothly from check-in to duty-free, and of course since it would mean hiring hundreds more security agents, ticket prices would go up.

And yet, this seemingly ‘unfair’ system seems to have something our Western systems lack – they WORK. In the rest of the article, the columnist seems to decry the unfairness of it all, and yet is forced to admit:

Racial profiling seems to work. Since the 1972 Lod Airport massacre, in which 26 people were murdered, there have been no successful attacks on Israeli air-traffic and almost all the attempts that did take place were carried out on foreign soil.

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Scott Morefield is a news and opinion columnist for BizPac Review. In addition to his work on BPR, Scott's commentary can also be found on Townhall, TheBlaze, The Hill, WND, Breitbart, National Review, The Federalist, and many other sites, including A Morefield Life, where he and his wife, Kim, share their marriage and parenting journey.
Scott Morefield

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