DC Madam’s attorney threatens to capsize presidential race with damning list of names

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Yet another sordid twist in the 2016 presidential election cycle could be looming.

An attorney who represented the late Deborah Palfrey, better known as the “D.C. Madam,” is threatening to release names on her call list that he claims could affect the outcome of the 2016 presidential election.

Montgomery Blair Sibley, who’s subject to a 2007 court order prohibiting him from publishing the names, said he’ll release one or more of them on the U.S. Supreme Court steps if he’s denied a hearing on the issue.

Sibley claimed the list “includes 815 names, addresses and Social Security numbers of Verizon Wireless customers,” according to U.S. News and World Report.

“Time is of the essence because people are casting votes in primaries and caucuses,” he said. “I believe this information is relevant to that political discourse.”

Sibley first revealed that one or more of the names could be relevant to the race back in January when the field was much larger.

With only two Democrats and three Republican contenders left in the race, he fears he could be jailed for contempt of court if he confirms any of those remaining are listed.

He refused to even acknowledge whether he was surprised by the National Enquirer’s allegations of Sen. Ted Cruz’s extramarital affairs.

GOP presidential front-runner Donald Trump likely visited the nation’s capitol during the time Pauley operated her escort service; all the other candidates definitely did.

U.S. News reported:

Complicating Sibley’s bid to release one or more name from the records is that he’s been having trouble getting a court to give him a hearing.

In February, he filed a complaint of judicial misconduct against Richard Roberts, chief judge of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, for allegedly instructing a clerk not to file his request for a hearing on modifying the restraining order. (Roberts resigned earlier this month on the day a woman filed a lawsuit claiming he sexually assaulted her while she was a 16-year-old witness in a case he prosecuted three decades ago. Roberts said the sex was consensual.)

About two weeks ago, Sibley asked the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit to order the clerk to accept his filing and, feeling a sense of urgency and lacking a response, hand-delivered an appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday.

 

“The footnote to the pleading I filed today says this: If I do not get the right to file my request to modify the restraining order and if I do not get an expedited hearing, I’m going to publicly release those records and see what happens,” he said. “If they want to hold me in contempt of court for violating an order they will not give me a hearing on, I think they lose the right to enforce that order.”

He added that the courts “are letting people vote blindly” by not promptly scheduling a hearing.

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