‘Put on your big girl pants!’ Successful young woman slams entitled twenty-something with scathing open letter

A whiny millennial who complained her salary wasn’t high enough to afford groceries got shot down by a fellow millennial outraged at her sense of entitlement.

Stefanie Williams, 29, posted her scathing critique of 25-year-old Talia Jane on Medium — the same website Jane used to bash the company she worked for, Yelp, and its CEO Jeremy Stoppelman.

In Jane’s open letter to Stoppelman, she complained that she couldn’t afford groceries and rent in San Francisco on her entry level salary.

Of course, rather than writing an open letter to her company’s CEO, she could have looked for an apartment in a cheaper city; but that thought didn’t occur to the entitled woman.

I haven’t bought groceries since I started this job. Not because I’m lazy, but because I got this ten pound bag of rice before I moved here and my meals at home (including the one I’m having as I write this) consist, by and large, of that. Because I can’t afford to buy groceries. Bread is a luxury to me, even though you’ve got a whole fridge full of it on the 8th floor. But we’re not allowed to take any of that home because it’s for at-work eating. Of which I do a lot. Because 80 percent of my income goes to paying my rent. Isn’t that ironic? Your employee for your food delivery app that you spent $300 million to buy can’t afford to buy food. That’s gotta be a little ironic, right?

 

And rather than be grateful she had benefits at her entry-level job, she complained about the copays.

Let’s talk about those benefits, though. They’re great. I’ve got vision, dental, the normal health insurance stuff — and as far as I can tell, I don’t have to pay for any of it! Except the copays. $20 to see a doctor or get an eye exam or see a therapist or get medication. Twenty bucks each is pretty neat, if spending twenty dollars didn’t determine whether or not you could afford to get to work the next week.

 

Jane no longer has to worry about the measly salary and copays — she was fired hours after writing her letter.

And Williams called the millennial’s struggle “utter bulls**t” in her own blistering open letter.

“It sounds like you’ve hit some real post Haitian earthquake style hard times, so maybe some advice will help while you drink the incredibly expensive bourbon you posted on your Instagram account and eat that bag of rice, which was the only other thing you could afford!” she wrote to kick off her letter.

Williams described her own struggle starting out as a waitress, being made fun of by her old high school classmates, and missing holidays with her family while finally making it to become a television screenwriter living comfortably after years of hard work.

Had you ended your whole whining disdain about full health coverage and expensive copays by saying you had taken a job at Starbucks, or a waitressing job in order to make money while you were on the search for a new job that requires the basic knowledge most teenagers with a Twitter account hold these days, I’d have maybe given you credit. Saying you moved in with several roommates to cut costs, tried to budget in a way that was more practical, and applied for jobs that were more about salary and growth than bragging rights and trends, I’d say hey, she’s making an effort. But you are a young, white, English speaking woman with a degree and a family who I would assume is helping you out at the moment, and you are asking for handouts from strangers while you sit on your ass looking for cushy jobs you are not entitled to while you complain about the establishment, probably from a nice laptop. To you, that is more acceptable than taking a job in a restaurant, or a coffee shop, or a fast food place. And that’s the trouble with not just your outlook, but the outlook of so many people your age.

You think it is somehow more impressive to ask strangers for money by writing some “witty” open letter than it is to put on your big girl pants and take a job you might be embarrassed by in order to make ends meet. And as someone who not only took the “embarrassing job”, but thrived at it, made bank from it and found a career path through it, I am utterly disgusted by your attitude.

 

Williams slammed Jane for not finding a second job or finding a cheaper city to live in and instead was spending her time blasting the company paying her so that she can eat and have shelter.

You expected to get what you thought you deserved rather than expected to work for what you had to earn. And that’s the problem entirely.

Work ethic is not something that develops from entitlement. Quite the opposite, in fact. It develops when you realize there are a million other people who could perform your job and you are lucky to have one. It comes from sucking up the bad aspects and focusing on the good and above all it comes from humility. It comes from modesty. And those are two things, based on your article, that you clearly do not possess.

Trust me when I say, there are far more embarrassing things in life than working at a restaurant, washing dishes, or serving burgers at a fast food window. And one of them, without one shred of doubt, is displaying your complete lack of work ethic in public by asking for handouts because you refuse to actually do work that at the ripe old age of 25 that you think is unworthy of your witty tweet creating time.

Spot on.

Carmine Sabia GET AUTHOR RSS FEED

Carmine Sabia Jr started his own professional wrestling business at age 18 and went on to become a real estate investor. Currently he is a pundit who covers political news and current events.
Carmine Sabia

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