School overreacts, freaks out over ‘racist’ photo of students wearing beauty masks

In the age where hypersensitive racial animosity is paramount for many people of color, courtesy of the most divisive U.S. president in recent memory, the simplest things are fraught with risk.

Such as taking a photo while wearing a beauty mask.

Two University of Wisconsin-Whitewater students came under attack for being racists after they took a photo of themselves with skin treatment mud applied to their faces, according to the Huffington Post.

blackface

And that was all it took for delicate snowflakes at the school to charge that they were wearing blackface paint.

A charge the students dismissed outright.

“I put it on the UW SnapChat,” said one of the students. “I didn’t really think about it being blackface. I just thought it looked funny.”

“There was no intention,” the second student said. “That’s nothing that we would have thought about in the first place … we had no intentions of offending anybody or anything.”

But it was more than enough to prompt University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Chancellor Beverly Kopper to send a message campus-wide condemning the photo as a “disturbing racist post.”

(It would seem that Kopper was paying attention when University of Missouri  President Tim Wolfe was forced to resign late last year because of a few disgruntled black students.)

“Last night a disturbing racist post that was made to social media was brought to my attention,” Kopper wrote of the photo. “This post was hurtful and destructive to our campus community. While social media can certainly bring about positive change, it can also be a place that deeply hurts and harms others.”

There are no words.

In addition to the chancellor’s hyperventilation, a working group will endeavor “to search for solutions to address racism on campus” and the school will hold race awareness forums, the Huffington Post noted.

Fortunately, a Republican lawmaker was willing to lend a voice of reason to the insanity.

“The [chancellor’s] official statement misled students, parents, and the public by confirming that a racist event had occurred, even though it really hadn’t,” state Sen. Stephen Nass said in a statement. “The racial over-reaction of Chancellor Kopper and other UW-Whitewater administrators without first checking the facts of the situation is a stark example of how political correctness has warped the mindset of highly educated university administrators.”

“Frankly, these are the people responsible for educating our sons and daughters, but they seem incapable of applying reason or common sense,” he added.

Can we get an amen?

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